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Mapping The Democratic Forest : The Postsouthern Spaces of William Eggleston

Mapping The Democratic Forest : The Postsouthern Spaces of William Eggleston essay .................... Mapping The Democratic Forest The Postsouthern Spaces of William Eggleston by Ben Child "I'm taking pictures of life today." --William Eggleston One influence William Eggleston's photography acknowledges is Walker Evans's, an artist whose work also searches out the everyday corners of his cultural milieu. Evans's approach is marked by a "leveling of discriminations, between the beautiful and the ugly, the important and trivial." Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1936, by Walker Evans, courtesy of the Collections of the Library of Congress. hen the color photographs of William Eggleston first appeared at the Museum of Modern Art in 1976, they had no clear antecedents. The boldness of Eggleston's palette and his disregard for the conventions of black-and-white photography were shocking; nearly all the major critics were scornful, and Ansel Adams wrote a scathing letter of protest to curator John Szarkowski, baldly calling Eggleston a "put on." Using a dye-transfer printing method primarily associated with advertising, Eggleston's images draw out the deep, frequently striking tonal potentials of natural colors. But within the tradition of photography, as critic Peter Schjeldahl succinctly notes in his essay on Eggleston, "color befuddles"--and Eggleston's colors certainly did. One influence Eggleston's photography acknowledges, however, is Walker Evans, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Mapping The Democratic Forest : The Postsouthern Spaces of William Eggleston

Southern Cultures , Volume 17 (2) – May 27, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
1534-1488
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Abstract

essay .................... Mapping The Democratic Forest The Postsouthern Spaces of William Eggleston by Ben Child "I'm taking pictures of life today." --William Eggleston One influence William Eggleston's photography acknowledges is Walker Evans's, an artist whose work also searches out the everyday corners of his cultural milieu. Evans's approach is marked by a "leveling of discriminations, between the beautiful and the ugly, the important and trivial." Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1936, by Walker Evans, courtesy of the Collections of the Library of Congress. hen the color photographs of William Eggleston first appeared at the Museum of Modern Art in 1976, they had no clear antecedents. The boldness of Eggleston's palette and his disregard for the conventions of black-and-white photography were shocking; nearly all the major critics were scornful, and Ansel Adams wrote a scathing letter of protest to curator John Szarkowski, baldly calling Eggleston a "put on." Using a dye-transfer printing method primarily associated with advertising, Eggleston's images draw out the deep, frequently striking tonal potentials of natural colors. But within the tradition of photography, as critic Peter Schjeldahl succinctly notes in his essay on Eggleston, "color befuddles"--and Eggleston's colors certainly did. One influence Eggleston's photography acknowledges, however, is Walker Evans,

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 27, 2011

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