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Man's Better Angels: Romantic Reformers and the Coming of the Civil War by Philip F. Gura (review)

Man's Better Angels: Romantic Reformers and the Coming of the Civil War by Philip F. Gura... by Quakers, who were early supporters of Indian education. From there, he entered the household of Thomas L. McKenney, who ran the federal Office of Indian Trade and served as the nation’s first commissioner of Indian Affairs. McKenney was one of the chief proponents of the civiliza - tion campaign, and he found in his Choctaw ward proof of the policy’s wis- dom. McKenney eventually arranged for McDonald to study law with John McLean, an Ohio congressman and jurist. McDonald, however, did not remain in non-Indian America. Instead, he returned to Mississippi, where he became an influential tribal diplomat as the Choctaw labored to fend off growing demands for their removal in the 1820s. This symbol of the civi- lization policy’s success became a key strategist of tribal resistance and a defender of Choctaw sovereignty. In Peterson’s terms, he did not assimilate into white society so much as infiltrate it, drawing power from his sojourn in non-Indian homes and institutions. Peterson’s work does little to alter the general narratives of antebellum Indian history. The story of the civilization policy and its unintended con- sequences is a familiar feature of the literature. Historians have also paid ample attention to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Man's Better Angels: Romantic Reformers and the Coming of the Civil War by Philip F. Gura (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 8 (2) – May 25, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

by Quakers, who were early supporters of Indian education. From there, he entered the household of Thomas L. McKenney, who ran the federal Office of Indian Trade and served as the nation’s first commissioner of Indian Affairs. McKenney was one of the chief proponents of the civiliza - tion campaign, and he found in his Choctaw ward proof of the policy’s wis- dom. McKenney eventually arranged for McDonald to study law with John McLean, an Ohio congressman and jurist. McDonald, however, did not remain in non-Indian America. Instead, he returned to Mississippi, where he became an influential tribal diplomat as the Choctaw labored to fend off growing demands for their removal in the 1820s. This symbol of the civi- lization policy’s success became a key strategist of tribal resistance and a defender of Choctaw sovereignty. In Peterson’s terms, he did not assimilate into white society so much as infiltrate it, drawing power from his sojourn in non-Indian homes and institutions. Peterson’s work does little to alter the general narratives of antebellum Indian history. The story of the civilization policy and its unintended con- sequences is a familiar feature of the literature. Historians have also paid ample attention to the

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 25, 2018

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