Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Makeshifting: Black Women and Resilient Creativity in the Rural South

Makeshifting: Black Women and Resilient Creativity in the Rural South PUSH UP PUSH UP PP A Albert lbert CRIMP CU RIMP T LONG BURNING PIPE AND L G BURN NG CIGARETTE ARETTE T TOBACCO 1 1 NET NET WT W . 1 / /2 2 OZ . 120 • southerncultures.org // ESSAY Makeshifting Black Women and Resilient Creativity in the Rural South AMIE BARNES WAS the first black woman to own land at the Cro - ss roads. Her lot was right below the four-way stop, down the fork and to the left, directly in the sun, in God’s spotlight. Her neat, white shotgun Mhouse had a white, wooden screen door that led to a screened-in porch and a white, wooden porch swing—the perfect prelude to the inside—and all around us was beauty: pink roses and petunias, ripened okra and purple eggplant, collards and cucumbers, stems crisscrossing, like braided hair. Inside we sat on her red sofa, planted our feet on the beige linoleum floors, and prepared to talk about rural black women’s beauty practices during the early twentieth centur - y—hair styling in particular. I was eager to drown out the sounds of Steve Har Family F vey’s eu an d d the box fan blowing in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Makeshifting: Black Women and Resilient Creativity in the Rural South

Southern Cultures , Volume 26 (1) – Mar 21, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/makeshifting-black-women-and-resilient-creativity-in-the-rural-south-7kGQu2CjsE
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South
ISSN
1534-1488

Abstract

PUSH UP PUSH UP PP A Albert lbert CRIMP CU RIMP T LONG BURNING PIPE AND L G BURN NG CIGARETTE ARETTE T TOBACCO 1 1 NET NET WT W . 1 / /2 2 OZ . 120 • southerncultures.org // ESSAY Makeshifting Black Women and Resilient Creativity in the Rural South AMIE BARNES WAS the first black woman to own land at the Cro - ss roads. Her lot was right below the four-way stop, down the fork and to the left, directly in the sun, in God’s spotlight. Her neat, white shotgun Mhouse had a white, wooden screen door that led to a screened-in porch and a white, wooden porch swing—the perfect prelude to the inside—and all around us was beauty: pink roses and petunias, ripened okra and purple eggplant, collards and cucumbers, stems crisscrossing, like braided hair. Inside we sat on her red sofa, planted our feet on the beige linoleum floors, and prepared to talk about rural black women’s beauty practices during the early twentieth centur - y—hair styling in particular. I was eager to drown out the sounds of Steve Har Family F vey’s eu an d d the box fan blowing in the

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 21, 2020

There are no references for this article.