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"Lord, Have Mercy on My Soul": Sin, Salvation, and Southern Rock

"Lord, Have Mercy on My Soul": Sin, Salvation, and Southern Rock Up Beat Down South "Lord, Have Mercy on My Soul" "Lord, Have Mercy on My Soul" Sin, Salvation, and Southern Rock B Y J. M I C H A E L B UT L E R In 1971 the five-member rock-and-roll group Black Oak Arkansas released their debut album. The songs on the record illuminated themes addressed by Black Oak and the larger "southern rock movement." Most southern rock lyrics glorified such stereotypically male values as fighting, gambling, and sexual conquests. Two other songs, " The Hills of Arkansas" and "When Electricity Came to Arkansas," revealed a love of state and region that also permeated southern rock lyrics. Yet the most lyrically intriguing song on Black Oak Arkansas was titled "Lord Have Mercy on My Soul." Although most Black Oak songs were anything but serious, "Have Mercy" began with the deep, solemn voice of lead singer Jim "Dandy" Mangrum accompanied only by a church organ. The spoken introduction recited the story that Mangrum eventually sang. In a somber tone, Mangrum vividly described how he recently "walked through the halls of Karma" and "shook hands with both the devil and God," whom he "respected" and had "run with" throughout http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

"Lord, Have Mercy on My Soul": Sin, Salvation, and Southern Rock

Southern Cultures , Volume 9 (4) – Nov 13, 2003

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Up Beat Down South "Lord, Have Mercy on My Soul" "Lord, Have Mercy on My Soul" Sin, Salvation, and Southern Rock B Y J. M I C H A E L B UT L E R In 1971 the five-member rock-and-roll group Black Oak Arkansas released their debut album. The songs on the record illuminated themes addressed by Black Oak and the larger "southern rock movement." Most southern rock lyrics glorified such stereotypically male values as fighting, gambling, and sexual conquests. Two other songs, " The Hills of Arkansas" and "When Electricity Came to Arkansas," revealed a love of state and region that also permeated southern rock lyrics. Yet the most lyrically intriguing song on Black Oak Arkansas was titled "Lord Have Mercy on My Soul." Although most Black Oak songs were anything but serious, "Have Mercy" began with the deep, solemn voice of lead singer Jim "Dandy" Mangrum accompanied only by a church organ. The spoken introduction recited the story that Mangrum eventually sang. In a somber tone, Mangrum vividly described how he recently "walked through the halls of Karma" and "shook hands with both the devil and God," whom he "respected" and had "run with" throughout

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 13, 2003

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