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Locals on Local Color: Imagining Identity in Appalachia

Locals on Local Color: Imagining Identity in Appalachia ESSAY ...................... Locals on Local Color Imagining Identity in Appalachia by Katie Algeo American popular culture has long defined Appalachia as an extraordinarily outlandish place. From Deliverance, copyright 1972 by Warner Brothers Incorporated, courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art Film Stills Archive. ertain Appalachian stereotypes were widely accepted by the early twentieth century, yet most people in the United States had never visited the region. Although information about the area was limited and came largely through a few channels, a general consensus about Appalachia nonetheless emerged in the popular culture: Appalachia was a place apart, a different and sometimes dangerous place, a place whose people possessed only the mere rudiments of civilization. Largely created by outsiders, this popular image of the region emerged during the latenineteenth and early-twentieth centuries in the writing of short-story authors, novelists, missionaries, social workers, handicraft organizers, and academics whose work forged a remarkably enduring stereotype of the region and its people. Where were Appalachian people in this process? Much recent analysis of the social construction of Appalachian identity has them silent and passive, objects of description and scrutiny who themselves contributed little to the popular conception of Appalachia. Were they in fact http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Locals on Local Color: Imagining Identity in Appalachia

Southern Cultures , Volume 9 (4) – Nov 13, 2003

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

ESSAY ...................... Locals on Local Color Imagining Identity in Appalachia by Katie Algeo American popular culture has long defined Appalachia as an extraordinarily outlandish place. From Deliverance, copyright 1972 by Warner Brothers Incorporated, courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art Film Stills Archive. ertain Appalachian stereotypes were widely accepted by the early twentieth century, yet most people in the United States had never visited the region. Although information about the area was limited and came largely through a few channels, a general consensus about Appalachia nonetheless emerged in the popular culture: Appalachia was a place apart, a different and sometimes dangerous place, a place whose people possessed only the mere rudiments of civilization. Largely created by outsiders, this popular image of the region emerged during the latenineteenth and early-twentieth centuries in the writing of short-story authors, novelists, missionaries, social workers, handicraft organizers, and academics whose work forged a remarkably enduring stereotype of the region and its people. Where were Appalachian people in this process? Much recent analysis of the social construction of Appalachian identity has them silent and passive, objects of description and scrutiny who themselves contributed little to the popular conception of Appalachia. Were they in fact

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 13, 2003

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