Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Literary Cultures of the Civil War ed. by Timothy Sweet (review)

Literary Cultures of the Civil War ed. by Timothy Sweet (review) and impose an “acknowledgement of inferiority” (181). But Calhoun’s explanations fell short of asserting that the territories had intrinsic value for the South. And southern independence, even had it been maintained, would have forfeited any hope for new slave territory. The Slaveholding Crisis nicely complements Matthew Karp’s This Vast Southern Empire: Slaveholders at the Helm of American Foreign Policy (2016) and related studies that foreground the expansion issue. But it could better engage with Freehling, who depicts the sequel to Lincoln’s election as an extraordinary and unpredictable departure rather than a logical sequel to trends that had built for decades. Paulus pays surprisingly scant attention to Freehling’s two-volume masterpiece, the most important history of the Old South ever published. If Paulus thinks Freehling shortchanged a key part of the story, he should say so. Did the white southerners fear something that might really have happened? Did the enslaved see any advantage in resorting to violent resistance? As this review may suggest, Paulus raises questions that remain unresolved. Daniel W. Crofts notes 1. The Diary of Edmund Ruffin, ed. William Kauffman Scarborough, 3 vols. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1972–89). 2. William E. Gienapp, The Origins of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Literary Cultures of the Civil War ed. by Timothy Sweet (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 7 (4) – Oct 31, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/literary-cultures-of-the-civil-war-ed-by-timothy-sweet-review-KHBWlBNdh5
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

and impose an “acknowledgement of inferiority” (181). But Calhoun’s explanations fell short of asserting that the territories had intrinsic value for the South. And southern independence, even had it been maintained, would have forfeited any hope for new slave territory. The Slaveholding Crisis nicely complements Matthew Karp’s This Vast Southern Empire: Slaveholders at the Helm of American Foreign Policy (2016) and related studies that foreground the expansion issue. But it could better engage with Freehling, who depicts the sequel to Lincoln’s election as an extraordinary and unpredictable departure rather than a logical sequel to trends that had built for decades. Paulus pays surprisingly scant attention to Freehling’s two-volume masterpiece, the most important history of the Old South ever published. If Paulus thinks Freehling shortchanged a key part of the story, he should say so. Did the white southerners fear something that might really have happened? Did the enslaved see any advantage in resorting to violent resistance? As this review may suggest, Paulus raises questions that remain unresolved. Daniel W. Crofts notes 1. The Diary of Edmund Ruffin, ed. William Kauffman Scarborough, 3 vols. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1972–89). 2. William E. Gienapp, The Origins of the

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 31, 2017

There are no references for this article.