Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Lincoln and Darwin: Shared Visions of Race, Science, and Religion (review)

Lincoln and Darwin: Shared Visions of Race, Science, and Religion (review) This book will undoubtedly, and properly, be read as the latest word on the role of manhood in the internal dynamics of the Union army. In some ways, however, the book seems to fall between two stools. Foote takes the army as a sort of microcosm through which to study northern manhood under pressure. We learn more then about the complexities and conflicts between northern men as men than we learn about how those conflicts mattered in the conduct and the outcome of the Civil War itself. On the other hand, this focus on the army, for all that it offers as a microcosm of the different forms of manhood present in the civilian world, also removes men from the larger gender order in an atypical fashion. Readers will probably think that what they are reading is a gender analysis simply because the subject matter is that of men qua men. The fact is, however, that Foote does not use the term "gender" and instead repeatedly explains the fundamental role of class in her analysis. She can hardly do otherwise given the way she has framed her study. Ironically, authors of earlier works on soldiers, such as Reid http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Lincoln and Darwin: Shared Visions of Race, Science, and Religion (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 1 (3) – Aug 12, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/lincoln-and-darwin-shared-visions-of-race-science-and-religion-review-0ezbswMyX0
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This book will undoubtedly, and properly, be read as the latest word on the role of manhood in the internal dynamics of the Union army. In some ways, however, the book seems to fall between two stools. Foote takes the army as a sort of microcosm through which to study northern manhood under pressure. We learn more then about the complexities and conflicts between northern men as men than we learn about how those conflicts mattered in the conduct and the outcome of the Civil War itself. On the other hand, this focus on the army, for all that it offers as a microcosm of the different forms of manhood present in the civilian world, also removes men from the larger gender order in an atypical fashion. Readers will probably think that what they are reading is a gender analysis simply because the subject matter is that of men qua men. The fact is, however, that Foote does not use the term "gender" and instead repeatedly explains the fundamental role of class in her analysis. She can hardly do otherwise given the way she has framed her study. Ironically, authors of earlier works on soldiers, such as Reid

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 12, 2011

There are no references for this article.