“Like a Cord through the Whole Country”: Union Bonds and Financial Mobilization for Victory

“Like a Cord through the Whole Country”: Union Bonds and Financial Mobilization for Victory david k. thomson On September 18, 1863, on the eve of his trial, Union spy Spencer Kellogg Brown wrote from his Richmond jail cell to his sister Kitty, relaying to her the supreme faith he held in the Almighty. "God has been very kind to me, and for the past twelve months I have tried earnestly to please Him," exclaimed Brown. Resigned to his fate, he attempted to put his house in order regarding "some little trinkets." Of greatest importance was his back pay, owed by the Federal government; he left no doubt for his uncle as to where this money should go. "Tell him to invest in United States six per cent bonds," Brown ordered. He left the purchase of such bonds to his Uncle Cozzens in St. Louis, who acted on his wife's behalf. Brown was executed a week later, on September 25, 1863.1 Given their broadly acknowledged importance to the Union war effort-- "The Yankees did not whip us in the field, we were whipped in the Treasury Department," one Confederate leader famously groused--it is odd that the Federal bond drives have not received more scrutiny from historians. To be sure, there is a general, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

“Like a Cord through the Whole Country”: Union Bonds and Financial Mobilization for Victory

The Journal of the Civil War Era, Volume 6 (3) – Aug 18, 2016

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

david k. thomson On September 18, 1863, on the eve of his trial, Union spy Spencer Kellogg Brown wrote from his Richmond jail cell to his sister Kitty, relaying to her the supreme faith he held in the Almighty. "God has been very kind to me, and for the past twelve months I have tried earnestly to please Him," exclaimed Brown. Resigned to his fate, he attempted to put his house in order regarding "some little trinkets." Of greatest importance was his back pay, owed by the Federal government; he left no doubt for his uncle as to where this money should go. "Tell him to invest in United States six per cent bonds," Brown ordered. He left the purchase of such bonds to his Uncle Cozzens in St. Louis, who acted on his wife's behalf. Brown was executed a week later, on September 25, 1863.1 Given their broadly acknowledged importance to the Union war effort-- "The Yankees did not whip us in the field, we were whipped in the Treasury Department," one Confederate leader famously groused--it is odd that the Federal bond drives have not received more scrutiny from historians. To be sure, there is a general,

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 18, 2016

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