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Learning from the Wounded: The Civil War and the Rise of American Medical Science by Shauna Devine (review)

Learning from the Wounded: The Civil War and the Rise of American Medical Science by Shauna... Learning from the Wounded: The Civil War and the Rise of American Medical Science. By Shauna Devine. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2014. Pp. 384. Cloth, $39.95.) Shauna Devine’s Learning from the Wounded is a major, ambitious, and on the whole successful eff ort in bridging the gap between two relatively discrete historiographies: that specifi c to Civil War medicine, and the larger body of work on the nineteenth-century American medical profession and medical science. Focusing on the Union side (leaving the Confederacy for her next book), Devine argues that the war “was more than a broad school of experience; it was also a conduit for the production, development, and dissemination of new medical ideas” (5). Government support for the col- lection of medical information, the rise of laboratory and clinical research and experimentation, increased medical specialization, and emerging techniques for the management of infectious diseases characterize what she terms the “Civil War medical model,” which would have a profound eff ect on American medicine (5). Devine begins by discussing William Hammond’s ascension to the position of surgeon general, his strict standards for military surgeons, and “Circular No. 2,” a one-page directive instructing medical offi cers to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Learning from the Wounded: The Civil War and the Rise of American Medical Science by Shauna Devine (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 5 (1) – Feb 5, 2015

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Learning from the Wounded: The Civil War and the Rise of American Medical Science. By Shauna Devine. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2014. Pp. 384. Cloth, $39.95.) Shauna Devine’s Learning from the Wounded is a major, ambitious, and on the whole successful eff ort in bridging the gap between two relatively discrete historiographies: that specifi c to Civil War medicine, and the larger body of work on the nineteenth-century American medical profession and medical science. Focusing on the Union side (leaving the Confederacy for her next book), Devine argues that the war “was more than a broad school of experience; it was also a conduit for the production, development, and dissemination of new medical ideas” (5). Government support for the col- lection of medical information, the rise of laboratory and clinical research and experimentation, increased medical specialization, and emerging techniques for the management of infectious diseases characterize what she terms the “Civil War medical model,” which would have a profound eff ect on American medicine (5). Devine begins by discussing William Hammond’s ascension to the position of surgeon general, his strict standards for military surgeons, and “Circular No. 2,” a one-page directive instructing medical offi cers to

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 5, 2015

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