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Kenneth and John B. Rayner and the Limits of Southern Dissent (review)

Kenneth and John B. Rayner and the Limits of Southern Dissent (review) Reviews111 Kenneth and John B. Rayner and the Limits of Southern Dissent. By Gregg Cantrell. University of Illinois Press, 1993. 361 pp. Cloth, $47.50. Reviewed by Paul D. Escott, who teaches history at Wake Forest University. He is the author of Many Excellent People: Power and Privilege in North Carolina, 1800-1900 and coauthor ofA History of African Americans in North Carolina. The content of this well-researched book is not exactly what many readers will expect. Kenneth Rayner, a prominent and well-connected North Carolina politician in the middle decades of the nineteenth century, fathered an illegitimate son by one of his slaves in 1850. That child, John B. Rayner, became prominent among Texas Populists in the 1890s. Both the title and dust jacket suggest that this book will explore the links between the two men and use their lives to study the southern social system and the amount of dissent it tolerated. Despite Cantrell's attempt to give attention to these subjects, the book remains a more nanow and conventional political history of two separate individuals, who apparently had few, if any, ties between them aside from their genes. Kenneth Rayner certainly had an intriguing political career. Long popular among http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Kenneth and John B. Rayner and the Limits of Southern Dissent (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 2 (1) – Jan 4, 1995

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Reviews111 Kenneth and John B. Rayner and the Limits of Southern Dissent. By Gregg Cantrell. University of Illinois Press, 1993. 361 pp. Cloth, $47.50. Reviewed by Paul D. Escott, who teaches history at Wake Forest University. He is the author of Many Excellent People: Power and Privilege in North Carolina, 1800-1900 and coauthor ofA History of African Americans in North Carolina. The content of this well-researched book is not exactly what many readers will expect. Kenneth Rayner, a prominent and well-connected North Carolina politician in the middle decades of the nineteenth century, fathered an illegitimate son by one of his slaves in 1850. That child, John B. Rayner, became prominent among Texas Populists in the 1890s. Both the title and dust jacket suggest that this book will explore the links between the two men and use their lives to study the southern social system and the amount of dissent it tolerated. Despite Cantrell's attempt to give attention to these subjects, the book remains a more nanow and conventional political history of two separate individuals, who apparently had few, if any, ties between them aside from their genes. Kenneth Rayner certainly had an intriguing political career. Long popular among

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

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