Katherine Paston and Brilliana Harley: Maternal Letters and the Genre of Mother's Advice

Katherine Paston and Brilliana Harley: Maternal Letters and the Genre of Mother's Advice by Raymond A. Anselment MONG the conduct books popular in the early seventeenth century are several on maternal advice written by women who found in the newly acknowledged responsibilities of motherhood the potential for personal fulfillment.1 In particular, the numerous editions of works by Elizabeth Grymeston, Dorothy Leigh, and Elizabeth Joscelin reflect the growing Protestant recognition that mothers must share with their husbands the obligation to ensure their children's welfare.2 For any woman who has ``carried her child within her, so neere 1 Betty S. Travitsky remains among the first and foremost proponent of this view of motherhood: ``A new mother [a description now commonly accepted] was developed who was a learned, pious, and responsible woman with increased and clear-cut responsibility for the raising of her children as well as a clearly recognized right to selfdevelopment for her own sake'' (``The New Mother of the English Renaissance (1489­ 1659): A Descriptive Catalogue,'' Bulletin of Research in the Humanities 82 [1979]: 64). As she notes in a subsequent essay, her characterization of motherhood comes from the title of Erasmus's colloquy, ``The New Mother'' (``The New Mother of the English Renaissance: Her Writings on Motherhood,'' in The Lost Tradition: Mothers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in Philology University of North Carolina Press

Katherine Paston and Brilliana Harley: Maternal Letters and the Genre of Mother's Advice

Studies in Philology, Volume 101 (4)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1543-0383
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Abstract

by Raymond A. Anselment MONG the conduct books popular in the early seventeenth century are several on maternal advice written by women who found in the newly acknowledged responsibilities of motherhood the potential for personal fulfillment.1 In particular, the numerous editions of works by Elizabeth Grymeston, Dorothy Leigh, and Elizabeth Joscelin reflect the growing Protestant recognition that mothers must share with their husbands the obligation to ensure their children's welfare.2 For any woman who has ``carried her child within her, so neere 1 Betty S. Travitsky remains among the first and foremost proponent of this view of motherhood: ``A new mother [a description now commonly accepted] was developed who was a learned, pious, and responsible woman with increased and clear-cut responsibility for the raising of her children as well as a clearly recognized right to selfdevelopment for her own sake'' (``The New Mother of the English Renaissance (1489­ 1659): A Descriptive Catalogue,'' Bulletin of Research in the Humanities 82 [1979]: 64). As she notes in a subsequent essay, her characterization of motherhood comes from the title of Erasmus's colloquy, ``The New Mother'' (``The New Mother of the English Renaissance: Her Writings on Motherhood,'' in The Lost Tradition: Mothers

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Studies in PhilologyUniversity of North Carolina Press

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