Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Justice in Blue and Gray: A Legal History of the Civil War (review)

Justice in Blue and Gray: A Legal History of the Civil War (review) British-American Relations (2008), which demonstrates a surer grasp of both British domestic and foreign policy, including a useful summation of Anglo-American relations before the confl ict, vital to an understand- ing of this subject. Finally, Jones’s book does not meet the gold standard of impartiality established by D. P. Crook’s The North, the South, and the Powers, 1861–1865 (1974). Mistakes and blunders by William H. Seward and Charles Francis Adams are excused, justifi ed, or explained away—a courtesy rarely extended to either Palmerston or Russell. This is a well-researched, judicious, and for the most part persuasive study, however. Its shortcomings refl ect the enormity of the task of prop- erly placing the American Civil War within an international context. Jones’s work goes a long way in the fulfi llment of this objective. Not only do scholars of American Civil War diplomacy need to read this book, but so do scholars of the confl ict period more generally. du nc an an dr ew c ampbel l not es 1. Andrew Lambert, “Winning without Fighting: British Grand Strategy and Its Application to the United States, 1815–65,” in Strategic Logic and Political Rationality: Essays in Honor of Michael I. Handel, edited http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Justice in Blue and Gray: A Legal History of the Civil War (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/justice-in-blue-and-gray-a-legal-history-of-the-civil-war-review-zYU0KTUBGe
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

British-American Relations (2008), which demonstrates a surer grasp of both British domestic and foreign policy, including a useful summation of Anglo-American relations before the confl ict, vital to an understand- ing of this subject. Finally, Jones’s book does not meet the gold standard of impartiality established by D. P. Crook’s The North, the South, and the Powers, 1861–1865 (1974). Mistakes and blunders by William H. Seward and Charles Francis Adams are excused, justifi ed, or explained away—a courtesy rarely extended to either Palmerston or Russell. This is a well-researched, judicious, and for the most part persuasive study, however. Its shortcomings refl ect the enormity of the task of prop- erly placing the American Civil War within an international context. Jones’s work goes a long way in the fulfi llment of this objective. Not only do scholars of American Civil War diplomacy need to read this book, but so do scholars of the confl ict period more generally. du nc an an dr ew c ampbel l not es 1. Andrew Lambert, “Winning without Fighting: British Grand Strategy and Its Application to the United States, 1815–65,” in Strategic Logic and Political Rationality: Essays in Honor of Michael I. Handel, edited

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 3, 2011

There are no references for this article.