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Iron and Steel Class, Race, and Community in Birmingham, Alabama, 1875-1920 (review)

Iron and Steel Class, Race, and Community in Birmingham, Alabama, 1875-1920 (review) J. P. Morgan refreshed themselves on the sea islands, now reborn as playgrounds and nature preserves. The illusions of the planters were swept away just as the illusions of the Trustees had been more than a century earlier. Will the new illusion of mastery by capitalism and technology disintegrate too? Stewart seems to imply that it will. Ably written and thoroughly researched, Stewart's book is ample in both secondary and primary documentation. His approach is, from the viewpoint of an environmental historian, somewhat limited by his definition of landscape as the field of interaction between nature and culture -- specifically, between nature and the culture the European colonists created. Treatment of the Native American landscape that preceded European setdement is limited, and wildlife is viewed as a food source and a danger to crops rather than an essential aspect of the environment in which a succession of human cultures thrived. Forests are treated as a fuel source and an index to fertility; Stewart's fullest discussion of forest history comes late in the book, with his account of the upland longleaf pinewoods under the hands of loggers in the days of the New South. As Stewart no doubt intended, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Iron and Steel Class, Race, and Community in Birmingham, Alabama, 1875-1920 (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 4 (3) – Jan 4, 1998

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
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Abstract

J. P. Morgan refreshed themselves on the sea islands, now reborn as playgrounds and nature preserves. The illusions of the planters were swept away just as the illusions of the Trustees had been more than a century earlier. Will the new illusion of mastery by capitalism and technology disintegrate too? Stewart seems to imply that it will. Ably written and thoroughly researched, Stewart's book is ample in both secondary and primary documentation. His approach is, from the viewpoint of an environmental historian, somewhat limited by his definition of landscape as the field of interaction between nature and culture -- specifically, between nature and the culture the European colonists created. Treatment of the Native American landscape that preceded European setdement is limited, and wildlife is viewed as a food source and a danger to crops rather than an essential aspect of the environment in which a succession of human cultures thrived. Forests are treated as a fuel source and an index to fertility; Stewart's fullest discussion of forest history comes late in the book, with his account of the upland longleaf pinewoods under the hands of loggers in the days of the New South. As Stewart no doubt intended,

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1998

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