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Irish Catholic Writers and the Invention of the American South by Bryan Giemza (review)

Irish Catholic Writers and the Invention of the American South by Bryan Giemza (review) Irish Catholic Writers and the Invention of the American South. By Bryan Giemza. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2013. Pp. 361. Cloth, $49.95.) Bryan Giemza has set out to put Irish Catholic writers at the center, rather than the periphery, in the creation of a distinct identity in the American South. Focusing on writers of Irish Catholic lineage born or who lived in the South, Giemza believes that the Irish "participated in engineering the mindscape of the South" and not merely as defined "others." Indeed, because the Catholic Irish were "by nature somewhat outside the American cultural mainstream" as nineteenth-century America's first immigration "problem," they "helped invent for the South a regional mythos, an enduring literature, and a national image" (289, 22). The majority of Giemza's analysis naturally focuses on prominent twentieth-century writers such as Flannery O'Connor and Pat Conroy. Despite the twentieth-century emphasis, this book still has a lot to offer historians of the Civil War. A chapter dedicated to the antebellum era and the conflict itself provides valuable insight, for example, into the role of Irish American women in the propaganda efforts of the Confederacy. Most scholars know of Rose O'Neal Greenhow and her famous http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Irish Catholic Writers and the Invention of the American South by Bryan Giemza (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 4 (4) – Nov 8, 2014

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

Irish Catholic Writers and the Invention of the American South. By Bryan Giemza. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2013. Pp. 361. Cloth, $49.95.) Bryan Giemza has set out to put Irish Catholic writers at the center, rather than the periphery, in the creation of a distinct identity in the American South. Focusing on writers of Irish Catholic lineage born or who lived in the South, Giemza believes that the Irish "participated in engineering the mindscape of the South" and not merely as defined "others." Indeed, because the Catholic Irish were "by nature somewhat outside the American cultural mainstream" as nineteenth-century America's first immigration "problem," they "helped invent for the South a regional mythos, an enduring literature, and a national image" (289, 22). The majority of Giemza's analysis naturally focuses on prominent twentieth-century writers such as Flannery O'Connor and Pat Conroy. Despite the twentieth-century emphasis, this book still has a lot to offer historians of the Civil War. A chapter dedicated to the antebellum era and the conflict itself provides valuable insight, for example, into the role of Irish American women in the propaganda efforts of the Confederacy. Most scholars know of Rose O'Neal Greenhow and her famous

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 8, 2014

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