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Ionesco: Recherches identitaires (review)

Ionesco: Recherches identitaires (review) which identity and the self are two die ff rent things (79). Chapter 2 is a rich explo - ration of the power of names, naming, and the unnamable in contemporary texts and includes a section on Kathy Acker, Toni Morrison, and the stories names tell (and retell). Chapter 3 astutely explores the posthuman and goes on to examine the posthumanity narrative and “apocalyptic intertextuality” of Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow, which Moraru suggests may be the most ambitiously memorious in the postmodern canon, as well as posthuman texts by Philip Roth, Joseph McElroy, and Marc Leyner. e Th n fi al two chapters directly take on the larger theoretical issues of the study, introduce new areas of investigation such as the postmodern sublime, and engage in lively debate with theoreticians like Jameson, Baudrillard, Lyotard, Nancy, and others. Moraru’s postmodernism is not ahistorical, culturally oblivious, or po- litically apathetic. Indeed, it is precisely its insistent citation and recirculation of earlier texts that acknowledge its cultural debt and mount ideological critiques, and he even allows that “postmodernism’s self-acknowledged reprises every so oe ft n surpr is u es with their powerful, unorthodox deviations from their ‘model,’ with their unexpected plot-twists, media mixes, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Ionesco: Recherches identitaires (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 31 – May 29, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

which identity and the self are two die ff rent things (79). Chapter 2 is a rich explo - ration of the power of names, naming, and the unnamable in contemporary texts and includes a section on Kathy Acker, Toni Morrison, and the stories names tell (and retell). Chapter 3 astutely explores the posthuman and goes on to examine the posthumanity narrative and “apocalyptic intertextuality” of Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow, which Moraru suggests may be the most ambitiously memorious in the postmodern canon, as well as posthuman texts by Philip Roth, Joseph McElroy, and Marc Leyner. e Th n fi al two chapters directly take on the larger theoretical issues of the study, introduce new areas of investigation such as the postmodern sublime, and engage in lively debate with theoreticians like Jameson, Baudrillard, Lyotard, Nancy, and others. Moraru’s postmodernism is not ahistorical, culturally oblivious, or po- litically apathetic. Indeed, it is precisely its insistent citation and recirculation of earlier texts that acknowledge its cultural debt and mount ideological critiques, and he even allows that “postmodernism’s self-acknowledged reprises every so oe ft n surpr is u es with their powerful, unorthodox deviations from their ‘model,’ with their unexpected plot-twists, media mixes,

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 29, 2007

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