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Inventing Stonewall Jackson: A Civil War Hero in History and Memory by Wallace Hettle (review)

Inventing Stonewall Jackson: A Civil War Hero in History and Memory by Wallace Hettle (review) a single serendipitous find, along with their progress all the way through to visits with Tinchant descendants. Almost twenty years ago, the anthropologist George E. Marcus encouraged scholars to practice what he called "multi-sited ethnography," by following actors, objects, or stories across different geographical locations.1 In Freedom Papers, Scott and Hébrard follow the pieces of paper that document one family's journey, not only across generations and continents but also across racial and national markers. This book is valuable for understanding the era of the Civil War and emancipation from a more transnational perspective--an endeavor relatively new to historians of the United States--but it is also, and no less, an illuminating scholarly journey into both transnational lives and transnational research. Perhaps subtle arguments, abundant detail, and complicated stories are all part of this important and innovative endeavor. Martha Hodes notes 1. George E. Marcus, "Ethnography in/of the World System: The Emergence of Multi-Sited Ethnography," Annual Review of Anthropology 24 (1995): 95­117. martha hodes, professor of history at New York University, is most recently the author of The Sea Captain's Wife: A True Story of Love, Race, and War in the Nineteenth Century (W. W. Norton, 2006). She is currently http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Inventing Stonewall Jackson: A Civil War Hero in History and Memory by Wallace Hettle (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 3 (1) – Feb 13, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

a single serendipitous find, along with their progress all the way through to visits with Tinchant descendants. Almost twenty years ago, the anthropologist George E. Marcus encouraged scholars to practice what he called "multi-sited ethnography," by following actors, objects, or stories across different geographical locations.1 In Freedom Papers, Scott and Hébrard follow the pieces of paper that document one family's journey, not only across generations and continents but also across racial and national markers. This book is valuable for understanding the era of the Civil War and emancipation from a more transnational perspective--an endeavor relatively new to historians of the United States--but it is also, and no less, an illuminating scholarly journey into both transnational lives and transnational research. Perhaps subtle arguments, abundant detail, and complicated stories are all part of this important and innovative endeavor. Martha Hodes notes 1. George E. Marcus, "Ethnography in/of the World System: The Emergence of Multi-Sited Ethnography," Annual Review of Anthropology 24 (1995): 95­117. martha hodes, professor of history at New York University, is most recently the author of The Sea Captain's Wife: A True Story of Love, Race, and War in the Nineteenth Century (W. W. Norton, 2006). She is currently

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 13, 2013

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