Introduction

Introduction Darrell Cleveland, Ph.D. Holy Family College Presently, the teaching profession is experiencing a massive shortage in the U. S. Shortages are especially high in large urban school districts and small rural school districts. Several reasons contribute to this crisis, which in turn produce other problems in classrooms. Ingersoll (1999A) found 42 percent of departures result from job dissatisfaction, the desire to pursue another career, or improve career opportunities in or out of education. Ingersoll (1999A) also noted that teachers in high-poverty and urban public schools depart because of job dissatisfaction, student discipline problems, lack of student motivation, lack of support from the administration, low salaries, and lack of influence over decision-making. Teacher shortages will continue as a result of increased school enrollment, high retirement rates, shifting urban demographics, and higher standards for teacher certification (Hidalgo, 1985). In his annual State of American Education Address, U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley (2000) asserted, "We need over two million teachers in the next ten years. We have a growing shortage of teachers in several critical fields including math and science . . . ." The national teacher shortage can also be attributed to the high number of beginning teachers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Darrell Cleveland, Ph.D. Holy Family College Presently, the teaching profession is experiencing a massive shortage in the U. S. Shortages are especially high in large urban school districts and small rural school districts. Several reasons contribute to this crisis, which in turn produce other problems in classrooms. Ingersoll (1999A) found 42 percent of departures result from job dissatisfaction, the desire to pursue another career, or improve career opportunities in or out of education. Ingersoll (1999A) also noted that teachers in high-poverty and urban public schools depart because of job dissatisfaction, student discipline problems, lack of student motivation, lack of support from the administration, low salaries, and lack of influence over decision-making. Teacher shortages will continue as a result of increased school enrollment, high retirement rates, shifting urban demographics, and higher standards for teacher certification (Hidalgo, 1985). In his annual State of American Education Address, U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley (2000) asserted, "We need over two million teachers in the next ten years. We have a growing shortage of teachers in several critical fields including math and science . . . ." The national teacher shortage can also be attributed to the high number of beginning teachers

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 3, 2003

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