Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Introduction to the Special Issue: The Intersectionality of Border Pedagogy and Secondary Education:

Introduction to the Special Issue: The Intersectionality of Border Pedagogy and Secondary Education: Introduction to the Special Issue: The Intersectionality of Border Pedagogy and Secondary Education: Understanding and Learning from the Powerful Worlds and Lives of Latino/a Youth Pablo C. Ramirez Arizona State University Pablo.c.ramirez@asu.edu Margarita Jimenez-Silva Arizona State University Margarita.Jimenez-Silva@asu.edu Like all people, we perceive the version of reality that our culture communicates. Like others having or living in more than one culture, we get multiple, often opposing messages. The coming together of two self-consistent but habitually incomparable frames of reference causes un choque, a cultural collision. - (Anzaldua, 1987, p.51) For the past two decades, historically marginalized youth have been underachieving in educational settings. More specifically, Latino/a secondary youth have not attained academic success in comparison to other youth (Ek, 2009; Gándara & Contreras, 2009; Contreras, 2011). Much of the blame from schools and other institutions is placed on students, families, and historically marginalized communities of color (Irizarry & Raible, 2011). According to the Pew Hispanic Center (Fry, 2014), Latino/a youth have one of the highest high school dropout rates in the educational system. Numerous research studies on secondary Latino/a youth have demonstrated that culturally irrelevant cur- ricula, pedagogy, unqualified teachers, and other educational factors have influenced the academic path http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Introduction to the Special Issue: The Intersectionality of Border Pedagogy and Secondary Education:

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/introduction-to-the-special-issue-the-intersectionality-of-border-9hoTBdPA7A
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

Introduction to the Special Issue: The Intersectionality of Border Pedagogy and Secondary Education: Understanding and Learning from the Powerful Worlds and Lives of Latino/a Youth Pablo C. Ramirez Arizona State University Pablo.c.ramirez@asu.edu Margarita Jimenez-Silva Arizona State University Margarita.Jimenez-Silva@asu.edu Like all people, we perceive the version of reality that our culture communicates. Like others having or living in more than one culture, we get multiple, often opposing messages. The coming together of two self-consistent but habitually incomparable frames of reference causes un choque, a cultural collision. - (Anzaldua, 1987, p.51) For the past two decades, historically marginalized youth have been underachieving in educational settings. More specifically, Latino/a secondary youth have not attained academic success in comparison to other youth (Ek, 2009; Gándara & Contreras, 2009; Contreras, 2011). Much of the blame from schools and other institutions is placed on students, families, and historically marginalized communities of color (Irizarry & Raible, 2011). According to the Pew Hispanic Center (Fry, 2014), Latino/a youth have one of the highest high school dropout rates in the educational system. Numerous research studies on secondary Latino/a youth have demonstrated that culturally irrelevant cur- ricula, pedagogy, unqualified teachers, and other educational factors have influenced the academic path

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Apr 23, 2016

There are no references for this article.