Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Introduction: The Future of Reconstruction Studies

Introduction: The Future of Reconstruction Studies luke e. harlow Historians of Reconstruction are currently at a crossroads. Reconstruction remains one of the most controversial—and least understood—aspects of American history, and that controversy began in the era of the Civil War itself. The genealogy of historiographic debate is familiar to anyone who has spent any time in the field: from the early competing interpre tations of participant historians; to the white supremacist and anti-dem- ocratic arguments of the Dunning school and the challenge from W. E. t view; to the 1960s advent of “revisionism” followed by B. Du Bois to tha “post-revisionism”—both of which rejected the Dunning school but were apparently divided on the degree to which they emphasized the hopeful or dour elements of the period’s history. For all their differences of interpre tation, the historiography shared many assumptions. Chief among them t Reconstruction, if national in scope, turned on two binaries: the was tha divide between North and South emerging from the Confederate War of Rebellion and the divide between black and white Americans emerging from the enslaved experience. Furthermore, although there was always some quibbling over the specifics of the chronology, the periodization remained relatively widely understood. Reconstruction began in 1863 with the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Introduction: The Future of Reconstruction Studies

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 7 (1) – Jan 26, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/introduction-the-future-of-reconstruction-studies-WjQm9zl21k
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

luke e. harlow Historians of Reconstruction are currently at a crossroads. Reconstruction remains one of the most controversial—and least understood—aspects of American history, and that controversy began in the era of the Civil War itself. The genealogy of historiographic debate is familiar to anyone who has spent any time in the field: from the early competing interpre tations of participant historians; to the white supremacist and anti-dem- ocratic arguments of the Dunning school and the challenge from W. E. t view; to the 1960s advent of “revisionism” followed by B. Du Bois to tha “post-revisionism”—both of which rejected the Dunning school but were apparently divided on the degree to which they emphasized the hopeful or dour elements of the period’s history. For all their differences of interpre tation, the historiography shared many assumptions. Chief among them t Reconstruction, if national in scope, turned on two binaries: the was tha divide between North and South emerging from the Confederate War of Rebellion and the divide between black and white Americans emerging from the enslaved experience. Furthermore, although there was always some quibbling over the specifics of the chronology, the periodization remained relatively widely understood. Reconstruction began in 1863 with the

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 26, 2017

There are no references for this article.