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Introduction — Narrative Practices in the Post-Cold War Transition: Cultural and Narratological Transformations

Introduction — Narrative Practices in the Post-Cold War Transition: Cultural and Narratological... Introduction — Narrative Practices in the Post-Cold War Transition: Cultural and Narratological Transformations Marcel Cornis-Pope The Comparatist, Volume 23, May 1999, pp. 111-116 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.1999.0017 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/415140/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 11:15 GMT from JHU Libraries ??? COHPAnATIST INTRODUCTION — NARRATIVE PRACTICES IN THE POST-COLD WAR TRANSITION: CULTURAL AND NARRATOLOGICAL TRANSFORMATIONS Marcel Cornis-Pope /TJAe imagination has now acquired a singular new power in social lifo. The imagination - expressed in dreams, songs, fantasies, myths, and stories — has always been part of the repertoire, in some culturally organized way, ofevery society. But there is a peculiar newforce to tlie imagination in social life today. More persons in more parts ofthe world consider a wider set of "possible" lives than they ever did before. Arjun Appadurai,"Global Ethnoscapes" (197) In his 1988 reappraisal of "Self-Reflexive Fiction," Raymond Federman ascribed to innovative fiction a strong reformulative function in recent history, enhancing the critical dialogue between individual and culture through "self-consciousness," which draws the reader into the workings of the text and its cultural environment, and "self-referentiaUty," which pits the author's consciousness against the rhetoric of his http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Introduction — Narrative Practices in the Post-Cold War Transition: Cultural and Narratological Transformations

The Comparatist , Volume 23 – Oct 3, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Introduction — Narrative Practices in the Post-Cold War Transition: Cultural and Narratological Transformations Marcel Cornis-Pope The Comparatist, Volume 23, May 1999, pp. 111-116 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.1999.0017 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/415140/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 11:15 GMT from JHU Libraries ??? COHPAnATIST INTRODUCTION — NARRATIVE PRACTICES IN THE POST-COLD WAR TRANSITION: CULTURAL AND NARRATOLOGICAL TRANSFORMATIONS Marcel Cornis-Pope /TJAe imagination has now acquired a singular new power in social lifo. The imagination - expressed in dreams, songs, fantasies, myths, and stories — has always been part of the repertoire, in some culturally organized way, ofevery society. But there is a peculiar newforce to tlie imagination in social life today. More persons in more parts ofthe world consider a wider set of "possible" lives than they ever did before. Arjun Appadurai,"Global Ethnoscapes" (197) In his 1988 reappraisal of "Self-Reflexive Fiction," Raymond Federman ascribed to innovative fiction a strong reformulative function in recent history, enhancing the critical dialogue between individual and culture through "self-consciousness," which draws the reader into the workings of the text and its cultural environment, and "self-referentiaUty," which pits the author's consciousness against the rhetoric of his

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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