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Introduction: Immigration in the Civil War Era

Introduction: Immigration in the Civil War Era kath eri n e carper an d kevi n ken ny, Guest Editors While recent immigration scholars have turned most of their attention to the twentieth century, many historians are also reexamining immigra- tion policy in the mid-nineteenth century. Alison Clark Efford, in a recent review essay in this journal, reflects on how nineteenth-century immigra - tion historiography is marked by an “imperial framework in which the government of the United States endeavored to control new groups of people and bring them into the polity on a variety of terms.” This trend, she continues, emphasizes the “disputed and changing boundaries of fed- eral power” and the “diverse statuses held by US residents, showing that inconsistency and hierarchy were persistent features of governance” rather than “exceptions to the rule.” This special issue, although it is not based on the theme of empire, takes up several of these questions, especially the relationship between slavery and immigration; the balance between state and federal policy; the connections among race, birthplace, and citizen- ship; and the international dimensions of US immigration policy during and after the Civil War. The articles in this issue are part of an emerging body of scholarship on slavery, immigration http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Introduction: Immigration in the Civil War Era

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

kath eri n e carper an d kevi n ken ny, Guest Editors While recent immigration scholars have turned most of their attention to the twentieth century, many historians are also reexamining immigra- tion policy in the mid-nineteenth century. Alison Clark Efford, in a recent review essay in this journal, reflects on how nineteenth-century immigra - tion historiography is marked by an “imperial framework in which the government of the United States endeavored to control new groups of people and bring them into the polity on a variety of terms.” This trend, she continues, emphasizes the “disputed and changing boundaries of fed- eral power” and the “diverse statuses held by US residents, showing that inconsistency and hierarchy were persistent features of governance” rather than “exceptions to the rule.” This special issue, although it is not based on the theme of empire, takes up several of these questions, especially the relationship between slavery and immigration; the balance between state and federal policy; the connections among race, birthplace, and citizen- ship; and the international dimensions of US immigration policy during and after the Civil War. The articles in this issue are part of an emerging body of scholarship on slavery, immigration

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Sep 1, 2021

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