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Introduction

Introduction Darrell Cleveland, Ph.D. Holy Family College Presently school districts throughout the United States are experiencing a massive and growing teacher shortage. These shortages are especially critical in large urban school districts and rural districts. Many factors contribute to this crisis, which in turn produce other classroom challenges. Ingersoll (1999) found 42 percent of teacher departures are due to job dissatisfaction, the desire to pursue another career, or improved career opportunities in or out of education. Ingersoll (1999) also noted that teachers in high-poverty and urban public schools depart because of job dissatisfaction, student discipline problems, lack of student motivation, lack of support from school/district administration, low salaries, and lack of influence over decision-making. Teacher shortages will continue due to increased school enrollment, high retirement rates, shifting urban demographics, and higher standards for teacher certification (Hidalgo, 1985). In his annual State of American Education Address, U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley (2000) stated, "We need over two million teachers in the next ten years. We have a growing shortage of teachers in several critical fields including math and science . . . ." Teacher attrition in the Unites States is a serious problem that must be addressed through http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Darrell Cleveland, Ph.D. Holy Family College Presently school districts throughout the United States are experiencing a massive and growing teacher shortage. These shortages are especially critical in large urban school districts and rural districts. Many factors contribute to this crisis, which in turn produce other classroom challenges. Ingersoll (1999) found 42 percent of teacher departures are due to job dissatisfaction, the desire to pursue another career, or improved career opportunities in or out of education. Ingersoll (1999) also noted that teachers in high-poverty and urban public schools depart because of job dissatisfaction, student discipline problems, lack of student motivation, lack of support from school/district administration, low salaries, and lack of influence over decision-making. Teacher shortages will continue due to increased school enrollment, high retirement rates, shifting urban demographics, and higher standards for teacher certification (Hidalgo, 1985). In his annual State of American Education Address, U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley (2000) stated, "We need over two million teachers in the next ten years. We have a growing shortage of teachers in several critical fields including math and science . . . ." Teacher attrition in the Unites States is a serious problem that must be addressed through

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 10, 2002

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