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Into the Crater: The Mine Attack at Petersburg (review)

Into the Crater: The Mine Attack at Petersburg (review) Civil War, edited by LeeAnn Whites and Alecia P. Long (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2009). carol sheriff, Class of 2013 Professor of History at the College of William and Mary, is the author (with Scott Reynolds Nelson) of A People at War: Civilians and Soldiers in America's Civil War, 1854­1877 (Oxford University Press, 2007). Into the Crater: The Mine Attack at Petersburg. By Earl J. Hess. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2010. Pp. 352. Cloth, $44.95.) The Battle of the Crater is best remembered both for the massacre of African American troops and as a golden opportunity to end the war that slipped through Ulysses S. Grant's fingers. In Into the Crater, Earl Hess examines the action at the Crater in great detail and puts to rest controversies, including persistent claims that without Ambrose Burnside's egregious bungling, the war might have ended nearly a year before it did. Hess's account proceeds chronologically from the first notion of detonating explosives beneath Confederate lines, when Henry Pleasants, a lieutenant colonel in the Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Infantry, persuaded his superior officers that an underground attack held more promise than an assault on the Confederate trenches, to the disposition of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Into the Crater: The Mine Attack at Petersburg (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 1 (3) – Aug 12, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807
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Abstract

Civil War, edited by LeeAnn Whites and Alecia P. Long (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2009). carol sheriff, Class of 2013 Professor of History at the College of William and Mary, is the author (with Scott Reynolds Nelson) of A People at War: Civilians and Soldiers in America's Civil War, 1854­1877 (Oxford University Press, 2007). Into the Crater: The Mine Attack at Petersburg. By Earl J. Hess. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2010. Pp. 352. Cloth, $44.95.) The Battle of the Crater is best remembered both for the massacre of African American troops and as a golden opportunity to end the war that slipped through Ulysses S. Grant's fingers. In Into the Crater, Earl Hess examines the action at the Crater in great detail and puts to rest controversies, including persistent claims that without Ambrose Burnside's egregious bungling, the war might have ended nearly a year before it did. Hess's account proceeds chronologically from the first notion of detonating explosives beneath Confederate lines, when Henry Pleasants, a lieutenant colonel in the Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Infantry, persuaded his superior officers that an underground attack held more promise than an assault on the Confederate trenches, to the disposition of

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 12, 2011

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