Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Interracialism and Christian Community in the Postwar South The Story of Koinonia Farm (review)

Interracialism and Christian Community in the Postwar South The Story of Koinonia Farm (review) Brundage himself appears to be a convinced sociaHst, and tiiis perspective aUows him to teU Ruskin's story with passion. Though Brundage does not think die communitarians had die right solution to problems ofAmerican poHtical economy, he credits them widi asking many of die right questions and acknowledges the sacrifices and achievements of the Ruskinites. By explaining contradictions in the cooperative vision, on the other hand, Brundage makes a convincing case that American sociaHsts came to a rational decision to abandon communitarian views. Perhaps A Socialist Utopia draws the wrong lessons from the Ruskin experience. But Brundage is right that smaU, intentional communities teU us something significant about the nature of society in the United States and in the South. Interracialism and Christian Community in the Postwar South The Story of Koinonia Farm By Tracy Elaine KMeyer University Press of Virginia, 1997 236 pp. Cloth, $35.00 Reviewed by W. Fltzhugh Brundage, associate professor of history at the University of Florida and the audior ofA Socialist Utopia in the New South: The Ruskin Colonies of Tennessee and Georgia. In die most unUkely of places -- southwest Georgia-- a smaU group of Christian communitarians have labored for the past half-century to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Interracialism and Christian Community in the Postwar South The Story of Koinonia Farm (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/interracialism-and-christian-community-in-the-postwar-south-the-story-VkYlHbg1s0
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Brundage himself appears to be a convinced sociaHst, and tiiis perspective aUows him to teU Ruskin's story with passion. Though Brundage does not think die communitarians had die right solution to problems ofAmerican poHtical economy, he credits them widi asking many of die right questions and acknowledges the sacrifices and achievements of the Ruskinites. By explaining contradictions in the cooperative vision, on the other hand, Brundage makes a convincing case that American sociaHsts came to a rational decision to abandon communitarian views. Perhaps A Socialist Utopia draws the wrong lessons from the Ruskin experience. But Brundage is right that smaU, intentional communities teU us something significant about the nature of society in the United States and in the South. Interracialism and Christian Community in the Postwar South The Story of Koinonia Farm By Tracy Elaine KMeyer University Press of Virginia, 1997 236 pp. Cloth, $35.00 Reviewed by W. Fltzhugh Brundage, associate professor of history at the University of Florida and the audior ofA Socialist Utopia in the New South: The Ruskin Colonies of Tennessee and Georgia. In die most unUkely of places -- southwest Georgia-- a smaU group of Christian communitarians have labored for the past half-century to

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1999

There are no references for this article.