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Interpreting American History: Reconstruction ed. by John David Smith (review)

Interpreting American History: Reconstruction ed. by John David Smith (review) the region’s long coupling of piety and racial violence remains on display in Harvey’s final chapter, which opens and closes with the 2015 massacre at Charleston’s Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. This level of conciseness means making tough choices. Some will quib- ble with Harvey’s choices. Why does the early republic get two chapters when the longer Jim Crow era gets only one? Why so little time on the birth of Pentecostalism? Parts of the narrative necessarily feel thin and rushed. But the beauty of this volume is that despite its broad coverage, it reads like a story, not an encyclopedia. For that reason, it will work well in the classroom. It also arrives as a way to interpret southern religion that can account for its brutal oppression and redemptive hope. It is a story that incorporates white, black, and Indian believers, and skeptics, too. To do all that in roughly two hundred pages, and to do it well, means that this book is punching well above its weight. Matthew Harper matthew harper, assistant professor of history and Africana studies at Mercer University, is the author of The End of Days: African American Religion and Politics in the Age http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Interpreting American History: Reconstruction ed. by John David Smith (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 8 (1) – Mar 6, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

the region’s long coupling of piety and racial violence remains on display in Harvey’s final chapter, which opens and closes with the 2015 massacre at Charleston’s Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. This level of conciseness means making tough choices. Some will quib- ble with Harvey’s choices. Why does the early republic get two chapters when the longer Jim Crow era gets only one? Why so little time on the birth of Pentecostalism? Parts of the narrative necessarily feel thin and rushed. But the beauty of this volume is that despite its broad coverage, it reads like a story, not an encyclopedia. For that reason, it will work well in the classroom. It also arrives as a way to interpret southern religion that can account for its brutal oppression and redemptive hope. It is a story that incorporates white, black, and Indian believers, and skeptics, too. To do all that in roughly two hundred pages, and to do it well, means that this book is punching well above its weight. Matthew Harper matthew harper, assistant professor of history and Africana studies at Mercer University, is the author of The End of Days: African American Religion and Politics in the Age

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 6, 2018

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