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Intellectual, Social, and Moral Development: Why Technology Cannot Replace Teachers

Intellectual, Social, and Moral Development: Why Technology Cannot Replace Teachers Information technology is changing people’s thinking as profoundly as the printing press changed the course of history more than five centuries ago. The advent of information tech- nology, particularly the computer and the World Wide Web, was hailed as having “the poten- tial to revolutionize education and improve learning” (Dede, 1998, p. v). Futurists quickly envisioned “virtual schools” where students spend a great deal of time learning from their computer-as-teacher. Intellectual, Social, and Moral This article argues that as student use of com- Development: Why Technology puters increases, teachers will be more indis- pensable than ever to guide the intellectual, Cannot Replace Teachers social, and moral development of children. To illustrate this position, the article describes intellectual, social, and moral issues that one Vivienne Collinson teacher has faced in a technology-rich, 21st Michigan State University Century School. Her experiences demonstrate why technology cannot replace teachers and exemplify how computers in schools anywhere can be both a blessing and a burden for teach- ers. Educating for Intellectual, Social, and Moral Development Goals of education in the United States have changed little over the last 300 years and gen- erally fall into four categories: academic (in- tellectual), vocational (responsibility as a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Intellectual, Social, and Moral Development: Why Technology Cannot Replace Teachers

The High School Journal , Volume 85 (1) – Oct 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

Information technology is changing people’s thinking as profoundly as the printing press changed the course of history more than five centuries ago. The advent of information tech- nology, particularly the computer and the World Wide Web, was hailed as having “the poten- tial to revolutionize education and improve learning” (Dede, 1998, p. v). Futurists quickly envisioned “virtual schools” where students spend a great deal of time learning from their computer-as-teacher. Intellectual, Social, and Moral This article argues that as student use of com- Development: Why Technology puters increases, teachers will be more indis- pensable than ever to guide the intellectual, Cannot Replace Teachers social, and moral development of children. To illustrate this position, the article describes intellectual, social, and moral issues that one Vivienne Collinson teacher has faced in a technology-rich, 21st Michigan State University Century School. Her experiences demonstrate why technology cannot replace teachers and exemplify how computers in schools anywhere can be both a blessing and a burden for teach- ers. Educating for Intellectual, Social, and Moral Development Goals of education in the United States have changed little over the last 300 years and gen- erally fall into four categories: academic (in- tellectual), vocational (responsibility as a

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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