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Intellectual Manhood: University, Self, and Society in the Antebellum South by Timothy J. Williams (review)

Intellectual Manhood: University, Self, and Society in the Antebellum South by Timothy J.... of Maryland and Virginia. Which slaveholders responded positively to advertisements offering “ cash for negroes”? Was there a pattern among them? Did they ever attempt to limit the supply of slaves? What happened to all their new cash? Did the sellers invest it in another industry? Schermerhorn’s book is intended to raise such questions and encour- age others to follow the money behind slavery. Thanks to Schermerhorn and his colleagues, however, we are now beginning to realize where that money will lead: almost everywhere. Indeed, we are no more able to deny the connection between the rise of American capitalism and slavery than abolitionists could have denied that their purportedly free-labor products had no connection to slavery. As Schermerhorn points out, “Any American who wanted slave-free consumables had to bypass coffeehouses, forgo des - serts, avoid rum, eschew tobacco, swap cotton for wool or flax garments, and perhaps shun ships with cotton sails or caulking for consistency’s sake” (91). In sum, then, this book is a welcome addition to a lively conversation about slavery and capitalism. Craig Hollander craig hollander is an assistant professor of nineteenth-century U.S. history at the College of New Jersey. Intellectual Manhood: University, Self, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Intellectual Manhood: University, Self, and Society in the Antebellum South by Timothy J. Williams (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 6 (1) – Mar 12, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

of Maryland and Virginia. Which slaveholders responded positively to advertisements offering “ cash for negroes”? Was there a pattern among them? Did they ever attempt to limit the supply of slaves? What happened to all their new cash? Did the sellers invest it in another industry? Schermerhorn’s book is intended to raise such questions and encour- age others to follow the money behind slavery. Thanks to Schermerhorn and his colleagues, however, we are now beginning to realize where that money will lead: almost everywhere. Indeed, we are no more able to deny the connection between the rise of American capitalism and slavery than abolitionists could have denied that their purportedly free-labor products had no connection to slavery. As Schermerhorn points out, “Any American who wanted slave-free consumables had to bypass coffeehouses, forgo des - serts, avoid rum, eschew tobacco, swap cotton for wool or flax garments, and perhaps shun ships with cotton sails or caulking for consistency’s sake” (91). In sum, then, this book is a welcome addition to a lively conversation about slavery and capitalism. Craig Hollander craig hollander is an assistant professor of nineteenth-century U.S. history at the College of New Jersey. Intellectual Manhood: University, Self, and

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 12, 2016

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