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Inquiry and Irony: Promise and Paradox in Paul Jablon’s The Synergy of Inquiry

Inquiry and Irony: Promise and Paradox in Paul Jablon’s The Synergy of Inquiry Inquiry and Irony: Promise and Paradox in Paul Jablon’s The Synergy of Inquiry David Nurenberg Lesley University dnurenbe@lesley.edu Paul Jablon’s The Synergy of Inquiry (2014) is well-timed. The 2014 deadline set by No Child Left Behind (NCLB, 2002) for universal student proficiency has come and gone, and according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, “proficiency rates last year were below 50 percent for nearly every racial and ethnic group, in both th th reading and math, in both 4 and 8 grade” (Kamenetz, 2014, p. 2). Two decades ago, the outcomes-based movement refocused teaching and learning on “what students are expected to demonstrate they ‘know and are able to do’” (Spady, 1988, as cited in McNeir, 1993, p. 3). Its goals of reaching all students, refusing to “write off” or “give up” on struggling learners (especially struggling learners of color) were admi- rable, but the 2014 report was just the latest in a host of studies (summarized in Fairtest, 2003; Rose 2004; Sunderman, Kim, & Orfield, 2005) that revealed how student learning repeatedly failed to reach NCLB’s targets. Book Synthesis Jablon is but the latest in a series of educators who argue that the fault lies not so http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Inquiry and Irony: Promise and Paradox in Paul Jablon’s The Synergy of Inquiry

The High School Journal , Volume 99 (2) – Jan 24, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

Inquiry and Irony: Promise and Paradox in Paul Jablon’s The Synergy of Inquiry David Nurenberg Lesley University dnurenbe@lesley.edu Paul Jablon’s The Synergy of Inquiry (2014) is well-timed. The 2014 deadline set by No Child Left Behind (NCLB, 2002) for universal student proficiency has come and gone, and according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, “proficiency rates last year were below 50 percent for nearly every racial and ethnic group, in both th th reading and math, in both 4 and 8 grade” (Kamenetz, 2014, p. 2). Two decades ago, the outcomes-based movement refocused teaching and learning on “what students are expected to demonstrate they ‘know and are able to do’” (Spady, 1988, as cited in McNeir, 1993, p. 3). Its goals of reaching all students, refusing to “write off” or “give up” on struggling learners (especially struggling learners of color) were admi- rable, but the 2014 report was just the latest in a host of studies (summarized in Fairtest, 2003; Rose 2004; Sunderman, Kim, & Orfield, 2005) that revealed how student learning repeatedly failed to reach NCLB’s targets. Book Synthesis Jablon is but the latest in a series of educators who argue that the fault lies not so

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 24, 2016

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