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Inherit the Alamo: Myth and Ritual at an American Shrine (review)

Inherit the Alamo: Myth and Ritual at an American Shrine (review) 108Southern Cultures father-trained males, blacksmiths were able on a daily basis to make something useful and tough, an activity and indeed a stance toward life that was ultimately destructive of slavery itself. In this connection, Dew's major title, Bond of Iron, is absolutely marvelous, since those two nouns recapture so many aspects of what went on at Weaver's enterprise. The word bond in Old English referred to a householder. The term became conflated with another, bind. The word bond became the root of bondage and in its plural form came to mean fetters. Bind went off in a slightly different direction, but since it, too, was related to the word band, we still have a "band of gold." Eventually bond acquired a financial meaning, connoting a binding agreement, though the term bailbondsman shows how easily such terms recirculated to combine elements of money and constraints on personal freedom. The word iron has lad a less flexible history. Its suggestion of toughness and rigidity, but also malleability, set it on a semantic course that led to in irons, meaning in shackles, but it also came as a verb to mean "flatten." When iron went to sea, it referred to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Inherit the Alamo: Myth and Ritual at an American Shrine (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 2 (1) – Jan 4, 1995

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
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Abstract

108Southern Cultures father-trained males, blacksmiths were able on a daily basis to make something useful and tough, an activity and indeed a stance toward life that was ultimately destructive of slavery itself. In this connection, Dew's major title, Bond of Iron, is absolutely marvelous, since those two nouns recapture so many aspects of what went on at Weaver's enterprise. The word bond in Old English referred to a householder. The term became conflated with another, bind. The word bond became the root of bondage and in its plural form came to mean fetters. Bind went off in a slightly different direction, but since it, too, was related to the word band, we still have a "band of gold." Eventually bond acquired a financial meaning, connoting a binding agreement, though the term bailbondsman shows how easily such terms recirculated to combine elements of money and constraints on personal freedom. The word iron has lad a less flexible history. Its suggestion of toughness and rigidity, but also malleability, set it on a semantic course that led to in irons, meaning in shackles, but it also came as a verb to mean "flatten." When iron went to sea, it referred to

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

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