Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Industrial Development and Manufacturing in the Antebellum Gulf South: A Reevaluation by Michael S. Frawley (review)

Industrial Development and Manufacturing in the Antebellum Gulf South: A Reevaluation by Michael... only do what she did because of the unacknowledged labor of enslaved servants” (188). One strength of Greenberg’s book is her careful analysis of Sarah’s relationship to slavery. Noting the extraordinary mortality rate at the Polk plantation in Mississippi and James’s propensity to buy “very young” enslaved people, Greenberg dismisses any notion that the Polks were “benevolent” slaveholders. Although the sources are thinner, she also carefully tells the stories of those enslaved by the Polks. Her decision to tell this part of the story complicates and enriches our understanding of Sarah Polk. This history also contextualizes Sarah Polk’s Civil War and Reconstruction-era experiences and choices. James Polk died in 1849, and Sarah would live on for decades, a complicated and controversial symbol in an ever-changing country. Greenberg has written a thorough book, eminently readable and perfect for a wide audience of readers, both academic and nonacademic. Her cen- tral argument is that Sarah Childress Polk was a powerful political player in antebellum Washington, D.C., primarily because she “had perfected the ability to hide her power in plain sight under the mantle of female deference” (xv). The only quibble this reviewer has is that Greenberg so thoroughly proves Sarah Polk’s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Industrial Development and Manufacturing in the Antebellum Gulf South: A Reevaluation by Michael S. Frawley (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 10 (2) – Jun 1, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/industrial-development-and-manufacturing-in-the-antebellum-gulf-south-YlBq3ajG7v
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

only do what she did because of the unacknowledged labor of enslaved servants” (188). One strength of Greenberg’s book is her careful analysis of Sarah’s relationship to slavery. Noting the extraordinary mortality rate at the Polk plantation in Mississippi and James’s propensity to buy “very young” enslaved people, Greenberg dismisses any notion that the Polks were “benevolent” slaveholders. Although the sources are thinner, she also carefully tells the stories of those enslaved by the Polks. Her decision to tell this part of the story complicates and enriches our understanding of Sarah Polk. This history also contextualizes Sarah Polk’s Civil War and Reconstruction-era experiences and choices. James Polk died in 1849, and Sarah would live on for decades, a complicated and controversial symbol in an ever-changing country. Greenberg has written a thorough book, eminently readable and perfect for a wide audience of readers, both academic and nonacademic. Her cen- tral argument is that Sarah Childress Polk was a powerful political player in antebellum Washington, D.C., primarily because she “had perfected the ability to hide her power in plain sight under the mantle of female deference” (xv). The only quibble this reviewer has is that Greenberg so thoroughly proves Sarah Polk’s

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 1, 2020

There are no references for this article.