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In Union There Is Strength: Philadelphia in the Age of Urban Consolidation by Andrew Heath (review)

In Union There Is Strength: Philadelphia in the Age of Urban Consolidation by Andrew Heath (review) slaves and the operation of Baltimore’s thriving slave markets. The carceral state, ramshackle as it was in the nineteenth century, buttressed the slave regime in towns and cities during the antebellum era and was adapted to new purposes after emancipation. Adam Rothman notes 1. Frederick Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom (New York: Miller, Orton & Mulligan, 1855), 315. adam rothman is a professor of history at Georgetown University. In Union There Is Strength: Philadelphia in the Age of Urban Consolidation. By Andrew Heath. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019. Pp. 296. Cloth, $49.95.) A detailed and nuanced study of the city of Philadelphia during the Civil War era, In Union There Is Strength draws direct connections between local politics and nation building. In seven deeply researched chapters, Andrew Heath narrates the period between the 1840s and the 1870s on two fronts, the urban and the national, and concludes that the “entangled projects” of “economic development, territorial conquest, and civil war transformed a divided republic into a nation state” (5, 4). The multiple connections Heath draws between urban, sectional, and national history, although sometimes strained and anticipated many years ago by Robin Einhorn, are powerfully suggestive and should command http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

In Union There Is Strength: Philadelphia in the Age of Urban Consolidation by Andrew Heath (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 10 (1) – Mar 2, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

slaves and the operation of Baltimore’s thriving slave markets. The carceral state, ramshackle as it was in the nineteenth century, buttressed the slave regime in towns and cities during the antebellum era and was adapted to new purposes after emancipation. Adam Rothman notes 1. Frederick Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom (New York: Miller, Orton & Mulligan, 1855), 315. adam rothman is a professor of history at Georgetown University. In Union There Is Strength: Philadelphia in the Age of Urban Consolidation. By Andrew Heath. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019. Pp. 296. Cloth, $49.95.) A detailed and nuanced study of the city of Philadelphia during the Civil War era, In Union There Is Strength draws direct connections between local politics and nation building. In seven deeply researched chapters, Andrew Heath narrates the period between the 1840s and the 1870s on two fronts, the urban and the national, and concludes that the “entangled projects” of “economic development, territorial conquest, and civil war transformed a divided republic into a nation state” (5, 4). The multiple connections Heath draws between urban, sectional, and national history, although sometimes strained and anticipated many years ago by Robin Einhorn, are powerfully suggestive and should command

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 2, 2020

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