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"I Was Tellin It": Race, Gender, and the Puzzle of the Storyteller

"I Was Tellin It": Race, Gender, and the Puzzle of the Storyteller ESSAY Anne Goodwyn Jones a~'d like to diank Drew Faust for taking on what still seems in some quarters to be an unpopular project: applying actual thought to popular literature. Between Faulkner and Mitchell, scholars have chosen Faulkner. Few have taken Gone with the Wind seriously enough to write about it. It's not anthologized, eitiier. Of the southern literature anthologies I've seen, the only one to include a portion of, or even mention of, Gone with the Wind, is the OxfordBook oftheAmerican South, whose senior editor, Ed Ayers, is a historian.1 Certainly one of the reasons for this criti- cal and andiological neglect is the sheer size of the 1037-page book. Another must be the flapping of the last tatters of the old boundary dividing high literature, demanding study, from popular literature, which a true scholar would not even stoop to read. A third reason is the subject of Faust's talk: the knee-jerk racism evident in both what the book makes of black characters and what it omits. This last reason was critical a few years ago in the editorial board's decision to leave Gone with the Wind out of die Heath Anthology ofAmerican Literature. I was at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

"I Was Tellin It": Race, Gender, and the Puzzle of the Storyteller

Southern Cultures , Volume 5 (1) – Jan 4, 1999

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
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Abstract

ESSAY Anne Goodwyn Jones a~'d like to diank Drew Faust for taking on what still seems in some quarters to be an unpopular project: applying actual thought to popular literature. Between Faulkner and Mitchell, scholars have chosen Faulkner. Few have taken Gone with the Wind seriously enough to write about it. It's not anthologized, eitiier. Of the southern literature anthologies I've seen, the only one to include a portion of, or even mention of, Gone with the Wind, is the OxfordBook oftheAmerican South, whose senior editor, Ed Ayers, is a historian.1 Certainly one of the reasons for this criti- cal and andiological neglect is the sheer size of the 1037-page book. Another must be the flapping of the last tatters of the old boundary dividing high literature, demanding study, from popular literature, which a true scholar would not even stoop to read. A third reason is the subject of Faust's talk: the knee-jerk racism evident in both what the book makes of black characters and what it omits. This last reason was critical a few years ago in the editorial board's decision to leave Gone with the Wind out of die Heath Anthology ofAmerican Literature. I was at

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1999

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