<i>The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865–1896</i> by Richard White (review)

The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age,... characterizations even to racists responsible for legally limiting black com- munity options. Occasionally I found Thomas’s bones to pick with other critics and historians unnecessarily harsh and polemical, as in his continuing beefs with Jennifer Greeson’s ideas about the period or historians’ tendency to amplify racial enmity as the engine of Reconstruction instead of a political economy calculated to disenfranchise blacks. Thomas brings to his subject the courtroom demeanor of a seasoned attorney—not surprising given his expertise in law and literature and the two highly regarded monographs that came before The Literature of Reconstruction. No one could accuse Thomas of not having mastered the secondary literature that undergirds his innovative thinking. Nor can we dismiss his conclusion that, by the early twentieth century, the entanglements of Reconstruction on legal and political fronts had placed people of color on even shakier socioeconomic ground than in the immediate postwar years. Taking great care to interpret the contexts of postemancipation life as writers, judges, and politicians experienced its dense textures, Thomas models how not to allow current historiographic trends to govern our reading of the past. Jane E. Schultz jane e. schultz is a professor of English with affiliations in history and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

<i>The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865–1896</i> by Richard White (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era, Volume 8 (3) – Aug 20, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/i-the-republic-for-which-it-stands-the-united-states-during-nD93Nyy8p6
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

characterizations even to racists responsible for legally limiting black com- munity options. Occasionally I found Thomas’s bones to pick with other critics and historians unnecessarily harsh and polemical, as in his continuing beefs with Jennifer Greeson’s ideas about the period or historians’ tendency to amplify racial enmity as the engine of Reconstruction instead of a political economy calculated to disenfranchise blacks. Thomas brings to his subject the courtroom demeanor of a seasoned attorney—not surprising given his expertise in law and literature and the two highly regarded monographs that came before The Literature of Reconstruction. No one could accuse Thomas of not having mastered the secondary literature that undergirds his innovative thinking. Nor can we dismiss his conclusion that, by the early twentieth century, the entanglements of Reconstruction on legal and political fronts had placed people of color on even shakier socioeconomic ground than in the immediate postwar years. Taking great care to interpret the contexts of postemancipation life as writers, judges, and politicians experienced its dense textures, Thomas models how not to allow current historiographic trends to govern our reading of the past. Jane E. Schultz jane e. schultz is a professor of English with affiliations in history and

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 20, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off