Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of the American Maroons by Sylviane A. Diouf (review)

Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of the American Maroons by Sylviane A. Diouf (review) Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of the American Maroons. By Sylviane A. Diouf. (New York: New York University Press, 2014. Pp. 403. Cloth, $29.95.) While maroon communities have received signifi cant attention from scholars of Caribbean, Central American, and South American slavery, American historians have been slow to acknowledge the importance of maroonage in the United States. In a brief historiographical discussion in the introduction to Slavery’s Exiles, Sylviane A. Diouf argues that southern historians like Eugene Genovese have deliberately pushed maroons to the margins of the history of the enslaved. Part of the reason for this inatten- tion is a perceived dearth of primary source material, but the absence of large-scale revolts or vast maroon communities of the sort that emerged in the southern regions of the Atlantic world is also to blame. Diouf has scoured archives across the United States, examining accounts of fugitives throughout the Slave South to uncover the hidden history of American maroons, and produced a highly readable, original study that deserves a broad scholarly and popular audience. Arguing that traditional divisions of maroonage into petit and grand categories hold less applicability for American history, Diouf instead calls for classifying American maroons by their proximity http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of the American Maroons by Sylviane A. Diouf (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of the American Maroons. By Sylviane A. Diouf. (New York: New York University Press, 2014. Pp. 403. Cloth, $29.95.) While maroon communities have received signifi cant attention from scholars of Caribbean, Central American, and South American slavery, American historians have been slow to acknowledge the importance of maroonage in the United States. In a brief historiographical discussion in the introduction to Slavery’s Exiles, Sylviane A. Diouf argues that southern historians like Eugene Genovese have deliberately pushed maroons to the margins of the history of the enslaved. Part of the reason for this inatten- tion is a perceived dearth of primary source material, but the absence of large-scale revolts or vast maroon communities of the sort that emerged in the southern regions of the Atlantic world is also to blame. Diouf has scoured archives across the United States, examining accounts of fugitives throughout the Slave South to uncover the hidden history of American maroons, and produced a highly readable, original study that deserves a broad scholarly and popular audience. Arguing that traditional divisions of maroonage into petit and grand categories hold less applicability for American history, Diouf instead calls for classifying American maroons by their proximity

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 8, 2014

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