<i>New Directions in the Study of African American Recolonization</i> ed. by Beverly C. Tomek and Matthew J. Hetrick (review)

New Directions in the Study of African American Recolonization ed. by Beverly C. Tomek and... backed up with footnotes that contain only one or two sources, leaves the reader wondering if the point being made might have been stretched a bit. Further, he makes a case in several places about the importance of high wages to his overall argument for an egalitarian past, leaving the reader to consider the depressing state of wage labor in the United States today. This is a fair and valid point regarding present-day America; however, he cites no quantitative evidence to back up the assertion about high wages in the past. How high were these wages, and how would they compare, proportionally, to wages today? This is important information and would really help prove his point. The absence of such data, combined with his forceful argument about microeconomics being used improperly to bol- ster the libertarian agenda today, leaves concern that Huston might be too eager to ignore economic data altogether. At the very least, he needed to cite secondary works about wages and expand on that argument to show what other historians have said about the topic. At best, he could have delved into primary sources to paint a more thorough picture of the wage structure in early http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

<i>New Directions in the Study of African American Recolonization</i> ed. by Beverly C. Tomek and Matthew J. Hetrick (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era, Volume 8 (3) – Aug 20, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

backed up with footnotes that contain only one or two sources, leaves the reader wondering if the point being made might have been stretched a bit. Further, he makes a case in several places about the importance of high wages to his overall argument for an egalitarian past, leaving the reader to consider the depressing state of wage labor in the United States today. This is a fair and valid point regarding present-day America; however, he cites no quantitative evidence to back up the assertion about high wages in the past. How high were these wages, and how would they compare, proportionally, to wages today? This is important information and would really help prove his point. The absence of such data, combined with his forceful argument about microeconomics being used improperly to bol- ster the libertarian agenda today, leaves concern that Huston might be too eager to ignore economic data altogether. At the very least, he needed to cite secondary works about wages and expand on that argument to show what other historians have said about the topic. At best, he could have delved into primary sources to paint a more thorough picture of the wage structure in early

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 20, 2018

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