<i>Civil War Logistics: A Study of Military Transportation</i> by Earl J. Hess (review)

Civil War Logistics: A Study of Military Transportation by Earl J. Hess (review) at Appomattox. Yet so proud were these soldiers of their selfless loyalty and accomplishments that the survivors “never believed Confederate defeat had anything to do with them” (6–7). Thinking themselves a unique and elite group, most of the men, upon returning home, maintained their identity as members of the brigade and swore devotion to one another’s welfare. They supported one another materially and emotionally whenever possible, and between 1872 and 1933 they held annual reunions on the anniversary of their signature triumph at Gaines’s Mill. I question just one thing about this sparkling and very human his- tory. While repeatedly emphasizing the brigade’s ideological devotion to Confederate nationalism, Ural also admits that Texas was largely untouched by invasion or occupation during the war. True, many Texans experienced material shortages and economic inflation, but their state government and humanitarian organizations did an uncommonly good job of minimizing the suffering. Similarly, the Third Arkansas had been recruited mostly from the southeastern portion of that state, which saw little of the dev- astation witnessed in northern Arkansas. Consequently, men of the Texas Brigade, unlike soldiers from more battered parts of the South, received few appeals from family and friends to give up http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

<i>Civil War Logistics: A Study of Military Transportation</i> by Earl J. Hess (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

at Appomattox. Yet so proud were these soldiers of their selfless loyalty and accomplishments that the survivors “never believed Confederate defeat had anything to do with them” (6–7). Thinking themselves a unique and elite group, most of the men, upon returning home, maintained their identity as members of the brigade and swore devotion to one another’s welfare. They supported one another materially and emotionally whenever possible, and between 1872 and 1933 they held annual reunions on the anniversary of their signature triumph at Gaines’s Mill. I question just one thing about this sparkling and very human his- tory. While repeatedly emphasizing the brigade’s ideological devotion to Confederate nationalism, Ural also admits that Texas was largely untouched by invasion or occupation during the war. True, many Texans experienced material shortages and economic inflation, but their state government and humanitarian organizations did an uncommonly good job of minimizing the suffering. Similarly, the Third Arkansas had been recruited mostly from the southeastern portion of that state, which saw little of the dev- astation witnessed in northern Arkansas. Consequently, men of the Texas Brigade, unlike soldiers from more battered parts of the South, received few appeals from family and friends to give up

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 3, 2018

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