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Beyond Freedom: Disrupting the History of Emancipation ed. by David W. Blight and Jim Downs (review)

Beyond Freedom: Disrupting the History of Emancipation ed. by David W. Blight and Jim Downs (review) Ashley put these ideas to work as a congressman. He was an unabashed radical and thought from the inception of the Civil War that it was a “battle to end slavery” (94). Early in the war, he proposed Congress’s first Reconstruction Act, seeking to confiscate Confederate land and lease it to emancipated slaves. Congress rejected this measure, but in 1862 it accepted his equally pioneering bill to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia. Ashley again took the lead in 1863, proposing a constitutional amend- ment abolishing slavery in a package of bills that collectively repealed the Fugitive Slave Law, brought new free states into the Union, and authorized emancipated slaves to join the Union army at full pay. Ashley’s amendment did not make it through the House of Representatives, but subsequently he sponsored Illinois senator Lyman Trumbull’s Thirteenth Amendment and managed its passage through the House. Although his greatest achieve- ment, it did not signal the height of his idealism. Over the next three years, Ashley supported bills that protected laborers’ “right to work for a fair wage” (131), and he also introduced a constitutional amendment to give “blacks and women the right to vote” (142). Ashley’s colleagues http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Beyond Freedom: Disrupting the History of Emancipation ed. by David W. Blight and Jim Downs (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 9 (1) – Mar 1, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Ashley put these ideas to work as a congressman. He was an unabashed radical and thought from the inception of the Civil War that it was a “battle to end slavery” (94). Early in the war, he proposed Congress’s first Reconstruction Act, seeking to confiscate Confederate land and lease it to emancipated slaves. Congress rejected this measure, but in 1862 it accepted his equally pioneering bill to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia. Ashley again took the lead in 1863, proposing a constitutional amend- ment abolishing slavery in a package of bills that collectively repealed the Fugitive Slave Law, brought new free states into the Union, and authorized emancipated slaves to join the Union army at full pay. Ashley’s amendment did not make it through the House of Representatives, but subsequently he sponsored Illinois senator Lyman Trumbull’s Thirteenth Amendment and managed its passage through the House. Although his greatest achieve- ment, it did not signal the height of his idealism. Over the next three years, Ashley supported bills that protected laborers’ “right to work for a fair wage” (131), and he also introduced a constitutional amendment to give “blacks and women the right to vote” (142). Ashley’s colleagues

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 1, 2019

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