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Across the Divide: Union Soldiers View the Northern Home Front by Steven J. Ramold (review)

Across the Divide: Union Soldiers View the Northern Home Front by Steven J. Ramold (review) “devastating slaughter”; and the western Lakota, who were also “pulled into the fi ghting” (xiii). Beck concludes that military off ensives during the punitive expeditions often struck the wrong targets, leaving modern read- ers to wonder if they were actually necessary or simply a means to an end for General John Pope in a misguided eff ort to redeem his fl agging career. Thoroughly researched and well written, Columns of Vengeance has much to off er nineteenth-century historians. Taken together, these books provide an important intervention into the broader narratives of nineteenth-century Native history. Both authors seek to demonstrate how the events in Minnesota were infl uenced by the war in the East. For example, Berg and Beck remind us that the white men who ended up fi ghting the Dakota and others initially joined the army to fi ght against the Confederacy. Moreover, planning, supplies, transportation, and even Lincoln’s attention were all aff ected by the events occurring in the Civil War. At the same time, both authors connect the U.S.-Dakota War and its immediate aftermath to later Indian wars in the West. It set a tone for the later confl icts, especially in the ways that the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Across the Divide: Union Soldiers View the Northern Home Front by Steven J. Ramold (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

“devastating slaughter”; and the western Lakota, who were also “pulled into the fi ghting” (xiii). Beck concludes that military off ensives during the punitive expeditions often struck the wrong targets, leaving modern read- ers to wonder if they were actually necessary or simply a means to an end for General John Pope in a misguided eff ort to redeem his fl agging career. Thoroughly researched and well written, Columns of Vengeance has much to off er nineteenth-century historians. Taken together, these books provide an important intervention into the broader narratives of nineteenth-century Native history. Both authors seek to demonstrate how the events in Minnesota were infl uenced by the war in the East. For example, Berg and Beck remind us that the white men who ended up fi ghting the Dakota and others initially joined the army to fi ght against the Confederacy. Moreover, planning, supplies, transportation, and even Lincoln’s attention were all aff ected by the events occurring in the Civil War. At the same time, both authors connect the U.S.-Dakota War and its immediate aftermath to later Indian wars in the West. It set a tone for the later confl icts, especially in the ways that the

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 9, 2014

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