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Hybrid Citizenship: Latina Youth and the Politics of Belonging

Hybrid Citizenship: Latina Youth and the Politics of Belonging Abstract: Drawing from interview data collected from high school students in Broward County, Florida, this article explores how eight adolescent Latinas understand citizenship and belonging vis-à-vis circulating images and discourses on Latina/o immigration, immigrant, and Latina. The author examines Latina youths’ citizenship identities and belonging using the conceptual frameworks of transnationalism, cultural citizenship, and hyphenated selves. The author demonstrates how first-, second-, and third-generation Latina youths’ citizenship identities and belonging are continuously shaped by dominant discourses and stereotypical images while at the same time are responses that modify, resist, or echo these discourses and images. The insights of the adolescent Latinas point to theoretical and practical implications that could improve citizenship education in the context of globalization and transnational migration. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Hybrid Citizenship: Latina Youth and the Politics of Belonging

The High School Journal , Volume 98 (4) – Jun 19, 2015

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: Drawing from interview data collected from high school students in Broward County, Florida, this article explores how eight adolescent Latinas understand citizenship and belonging vis-à-vis circulating images and discourses on Latina/o immigration, immigrant, and Latina. The author examines Latina youths’ citizenship identities and belonging using the conceptual frameworks of transnationalism, cultural citizenship, and hyphenated selves. The author demonstrates how first-, second-, and third-generation Latina youths’ citizenship identities and belonging are continuously shaped by dominant discourses and stereotypical images while at the same time are responses that modify, resist, or echo these discourses and images. The insights of the adolescent Latinas point to theoretical and practical implications that could improve citizenship education in the context of globalization and transnational migration.

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 19, 2015

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