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How I Spent My Summer Vacation

How I Spent My Summer Vacation Not Forgotten BY LAUREN F. WINNER My students last summer had never heard ofJim Crow. U.S. Government is not an area in which I can claim expertise, but when I ap- plied for a summer job with Duke University's Talent Identification Program -- a camp for academically gifted middle- and high-school students -- someone in hiring thought my few years' study of American history and religion qualified me to serve as a teaching assistant for American Government: Practical Politics. A few weeks after receiving my college diploma, I arrived in Durham, armed with notebooks, The Federalist Papers, and all the youthful optimism and energy we twentyyear-olds are supposed to possess. At the faculty and staff get-to-know-you barbecue, three days before the students arrived, I was munching on a hot dog when a young black woman grabbed my arm and introduced herself as Sarah,1 the instructor for the government course. "I'm so glad you're here," Sarah said. "I have a syllabus for you, and I've just received the student roster. I think we need to pray about what to do with this bunch!" Twelve of our fifteen students were boys. All hailed from the Soudi: Florida, North Carolina, Georgia, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

How I Spent My Summer Vacation

Southern Cultures , Volume 4 (2) – Jan 4, 1998

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Not Forgotten BY LAUREN F. WINNER My students last summer had never heard ofJim Crow. U.S. Government is not an area in which I can claim expertise, but when I ap- plied for a summer job with Duke University's Talent Identification Program -- a camp for academically gifted middle- and high-school students -- someone in hiring thought my few years' study of American history and religion qualified me to serve as a teaching assistant for American Government: Practical Politics. A few weeks after receiving my college diploma, I arrived in Durham, armed with notebooks, The Federalist Papers, and all the youthful optimism and energy we twentyyear-olds are supposed to possess. At the faculty and staff get-to-know-you barbecue, three days before the students arrived, I was munching on a hot dog when a young black woman grabbed my arm and introduced herself as Sarah,1 the instructor for the government course. "I'm so glad you're here," Sarah said. "I have a syllabus for you, and I've just received the student roster. I think we need to pray about what to do with this bunch!" Twelve of our fifteen students were boys. All hailed from the Soudi: Florida, North Carolina, Georgia,

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1998

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