Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

"How 'bout a Hand for the Hog": The Enduring Nature of the Swine as a Cultural Symbol in the South

"How 'bout a Hand for the Hog": The Enduring Nature of the Swine as a Cultural Symbol in the South How 'bout a Hand for the Hog": The Enduring Nature of the Swine as a Cultural Symbol in the South S. Jonathan Bass Well, I've always heard, but I ain't too sure, that a man's best friend is a mangy cur. I kinda favor the hog myself. How 'bout a hand for the hog! --Roger Miller1 The "King of the Road," Roger Miller, had a genuine understanding of the southern fondness for hogs. "In the scheme of things, in the way things go," wrote Miller, "you might get bit by the old Fido, but not that gentle porker friend. . . ."2 For almost two centuries, the southerner's best friend (the hog) has endured as the ideal symbol of the region. In the Old South the swine served as the backbone of the southern farm and played a central role in the region's economy and culture. As the South changed from a rural-agricultural to an urban-industrial society, southerners relied on the hog in new ways: grocery stores met the demand for hog meat, agricultural fairs replaced the ritual hog killings, and barbecue restaurants perpetuated the region's dietary tradition of consuming pork. Both symbolically and in reality the hog http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

"How 'bout a Hand for the Hog": The Enduring Nature of the Swine as a Cultural Symbol in the South

Southern Cultures , Volume 1 (3) – Jan 4, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/how-bout-a-hand-for-the-hog-the-enduring-nature-of-the-swine-as-a-Ani00vPFtv
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

How 'bout a Hand for the Hog": The Enduring Nature of the Swine as a Cultural Symbol in the South S. Jonathan Bass Well, I've always heard, but I ain't too sure, that a man's best friend is a mangy cur. I kinda favor the hog myself. How 'bout a hand for the hog! --Roger Miller1 The "King of the Road," Roger Miller, had a genuine understanding of the southern fondness for hogs. "In the scheme of things, in the way things go," wrote Miller, "you might get bit by the old Fido, but not that gentle porker friend. . . ."2 For almost two centuries, the southerner's best friend (the hog) has endured as the ideal symbol of the region. In the Old South the swine served as the backbone of the southern farm and played a central role in the region's economy and culture. As the South changed from a rural-agricultural to an urban-industrial society, southerners relied on the hog in new ways: grocery stores met the demand for hog meat, agricultural fairs replaced the ritual hog killings, and barbecue restaurants perpetuated the region's dietary tradition of consuming pork. Both symbolically and in reality the hog

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

There are no references for this article.