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Horace Greeley: Print, Politics, and the Failure of American Nationhood by James M. Lundberg (review)

Horace Greeley: Print, Politics, and the Failure of American Nationhood by James M. Lundberg... make for great classroom discussion. Matthew Pinsker performs a deep dive into the frequently retold anecdote of Stephen Douglas’s rebuke to James Buchanan: “Mr. President, I wish you to remember that General Jackson is dead, sir.” Pinsker examines how this political fiction first took shape and how it has been deployed since. Frank Towers offers the closest examination of voting patterns during the era, showing how the opera- tion of “personal loyalties” undermines conventional narratives of the 1860 presidential election (163). Towers’s essay returns us to the point that Balcerski’s Bosom Friends so aptly makes in Buchanan’s case, and perhaps in the historical era more generally: the personal and the political were inseparable. Rachel Hope Cleves rachel hope cleves is a professor of history at the University of Victoria in British Columbia and a member of the Royal Society of Canada, College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. She is the author of three books, including Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America (Oxford University Press, 2014). Horace Greeley: Print, Politics, and the Failure of American Nationhood. By James M. Lundberg. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019. Pp. 231. Cloth, $34.95.) Clad in his signature white coat, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Horace Greeley: Print, Politics, and the Failure of American Nationhood by James M. Lundberg (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 11 (1) – Feb 24, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

make for great classroom discussion. Matthew Pinsker performs a deep dive into the frequently retold anecdote of Stephen Douglas’s rebuke to James Buchanan: “Mr. President, I wish you to remember that General Jackson is dead, sir.” Pinsker examines how this political fiction first took shape and how it has been deployed since. Frank Towers offers the closest examination of voting patterns during the era, showing how the opera- tion of “personal loyalties” undermines conventional narratives of the 1860 presidential election (163). Towers’s essay returns us to the point that Balcerski’s Bosom Friends so aptly makes in Buchanan’s case, and perhaps in the historical era more generally: the personal and the political were inseparable. Rachel Hope Cleves rachel hope cleves is a professor of history at the University of Victoria in British Columbia and a member of the Royal Society of Canada, College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. She is the author of three books, including Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America (Oxford University Press, 2014). Horace Greeley: Print, Politics, and the Failure of American Nationhood. By James M. Lundberg. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019. Pp. 231. Cloth, $34.95.) Clad in his signature white coat,

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 24, 2021

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