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Homeplaces: The Social Use and Meaning of the Folk Dwelling in Southwestern North Carolina (review)

Homeplaces: The Social Use and Meaning of the Folk Dwelling in Southwestern North Carolina (review) 120Southern Cultures ton and his neighbors occurs in the film. In the numerous scenes of Sexton working in his corn field, he always appears alone. Johnson also includes in her documentary historical film footage of mountain people feeding chickens, making molasses, and hoeing in the fields. The images look archaic and reinforce the feeling that Sexton, who still strips kernels from ears of corn to save for garden seed, has outlived many of his generation. Similarly, music-making as a family tradition seems greatly changed. Sexton recalls singing with his sister Hettie when they were children, and serenading his wife, Virgi, before they were married. Throughout much of the film, however, we see Sexton as a solitary musician, playing and singing alone in his house on Bull Creek. At one point the filmmaker presents old family photographs of Morgan, Virgi, and four children. Why are these children not seen in the film? Do they still live in the community? If so, are they supportive of their father and his music-making? Or do they fit a pattern familiar to many traditional musicians of Sexton's generation in which their children and grandchildren lack a deep interest in many of the older http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Homeplaces: The Social Use and Meaning of the Folk Dwelling in Southwestern North Carolina (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 1 (1) – Jan 4, 1993

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

120Southern Cultures ton and his neighbors occurs in the film. In the numerous scenes of Sexton working in his corn field, he always appears alone. Johnson also includes in her documentary historical film footage of mountain people feeding chickens, making molasses, and hoeing in the fields. The images look archaic and reinforce the feeling that Sexton, who still strips kernels from ears of corn to save for garden seed, has outlived many of his generation. Similarly, music-making as a family tradition seems greatly changed. Sexton recalls singing with his sister Hettie when they were children, and serenading his wife, Virgi, before they were married. Throughout much of the film, however, we see Sexton as a solitary musician, playing and singing alone in his house on Bull Creek. At one point the filmmaker presents old family photographs of Morgan, Virgi, and four children. Why are these children not seen in the film? Do they still live in the community? If so, are they supportive of their father and his music-making? Or do they fit a pattern familiar to many traditional musicians of Sexton's generation in which their children and grandchildren lack a deep interest in many of the older

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1993

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