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History and Commemoration: The Emancipation Proclamation at 150

History and Commemoration: The Emancipation Proclamation at 150 i ntro d uction History and Commemoration The Emancipation Proclamation at 150 martha s. jones Guest Editor Marking the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation presents a challenge for historians. Trends in historical writing do not unfold in neat, easily marked fifty- or one-hundred-year increments. Insight wrought from innovations in research and analysis does not easily coincide with anniversary dates. Still, we are mindful that in some moments scholarly exchanges attract the interests of broader audiences. As the nation marked the sesquicentennial of 1863's Emancipation Proclamation, an eager audience awaited an explanation of this remarkable episode in Civil War­era history. From intimate family reflections to ceremonial readings and rituals, commemorative events provided historians with occasions to serve as citizen-scholars who could both mark the public fact of the proclamation's anniversary and continue the work of producing new scholarship. The articles in this issue of the Journal of the Civil War Era provide one important example of how historians responded to this opportunity. The ethos that frames commemorations is not always consistent with the complexity and contingency that characterizes historical writing. Reflecting upon the 1992 quincentenary of Christopher Columbus's arrival in the New World, historian Michel-Rolph Trouillot remarked that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

History and Commemoration: The Emancipation Proclamation at 150

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 3 (4) – Nov 16, 2013

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

i ntro d uction History and Commemoration The Emancipation Proclamation at 150 martha s. jones Guest Editor Marking the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation presents a challenge for historians. Trends in historical writing do not unfold in neat, easily marked fifty- or one-hundred-year increments. Insight wrought from innovations in research and analysis does not easily coincide with anniversary dates. Still, we are mindful that in some moments scholarly exchanges attract the interests of broader audiences. As the nation marked the sesquicentennial of 1863's Emancipation Proclamation, an eager audience awaited an explanation of this remarkable episode in Civil War­era history. From intimate family reflections to ceremonial readings and rituals, commemorative events provided historians with occasions to serve as citizen-scholars who could both mark the public fact of the proclamation's anniversary and continue the work of producing new scholarship. The articles in this issue of the Journal of the Civil War Era provide one important example of how historians responded to this opportunity. The ethos that frames commemorations is not always consistent with the complexity and contingency that characterizes historical writing. Reflecting upon the 1992 quincentenary of Christopher Columbus's arrival in the New World, historian Michel-Rolph Trouillot remarked that

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 16, 2013

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