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Hemingway and French Writers (review)

Hemingway and French Writers (review) Ben Stoltzfus, Hemingway and French Writers Kent: Kent State University Press, 2009 Guided by Hemingway’s “iceberg” principle that seven eighths of what he writes is hidden from view, this book examines the “artistic reciprocity” (xxii) between Hemingway and major French writers of the r fi st half of the twentieth century, in- cluding key nineteenth- century forerunners and later twentieth- century theorists. e Th prism for these “transatlantic refractions” (xxv) is Paris, the center of an “inter- national literary space” (xiii), where Hemingway, “a novice writer from the literary backwater of America” (xvi), learns, grows, and eventually gains ascendancy as “the master of modernity” (xxii). Stoltzfus has proven himself to be a perceptive com- paratist and the present work makes judicious use of pertinent studies and com- mentaries by others as well as material of his own that had appeared previously. Largely following the chronology of Hemingway’s works, the specic fi pairings of this analysis reveal a “structural necessity” (xxvii) that brings a fresh perspective to both sides. In a r fi st chapter the author explores Hemingway’s introduction to French writers and other artists during his years in Paris in the 1920s where “the people he met and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Hemingway and French Writers (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 35 – Jun 15, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Ben Stoltzfus, Hemingway and French Writers Kent: Kent State University Press, 2009 Guided by Hemingway’s “iceberg” principle that seven eighths of what he writes is hidden from view, this book examines the “artistic reciprocity” (xxii) between Hemingway and major French writers of the r fi st half of the twentieth century, in- cluding key nineteenth- century forerunners and later twentieth- century theorists. e Th prism for these “transatlantic refractions” (xxv) is Paris, the center of an “inter- national literary space” (xiii), where Hemingway, “a novice writer from the literary backwater of America” (xvi), learns, grows, and eventually gains ascendancy as “the master of modernity” (xxii). Stoltzfus has proven himself to be a perceptive com- paratist and the present work makes judicious use of pertinent studies and com- mentaries by others as well as material of his own that had appeared previously. Largely following the chronology of Hemingway’s works, the specic fi pairings of this analysis reveal a “structural necessity” (xxvii) that brings a fresh perspective to both sides. In a r fi st chapter the author explores Hemingway’s introduction to French writers and other artists during his years in Paris in the 1920s where “the people he met and

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 15, 2011

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