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Gumbo Ya-Ya or, What Pearson Can’t Hear: Opt-Out, Standardized Testing, and Student Surveillance

Gumbo Ya-Ya or, What Pearson Can’t Hear: Opt-Out, Standardized Testing, and Student Surveillance From the Editorial Board Zan Crowder Stephanie Konle As end-of-course and end-of-grade testing season approaches in North Carolina, schools and school districts have been contacting members of the UNC School of Education with requests for aid in proctoring the upcoming tests. Mandates require that test administrators be accompanied by a proctor in order to protect the security of the testing environment. While this practice promotes suspicion about public school teachers who serve as test administrators, the mandate also presents the logistical problem of providing enough adults to serve as proctors for the hundreds of tests taken by students at the end of the school year. The proliferation of state-mandated tests, coupled with requirements for separate setting accommodations, creates a practical dilemma for schools. This ground-level tension between the mandates of standardized testing and the limited availability of resources necessary for compliance is an issue in the debate over opt-out policies that tends to be overlooked. While proponents and opponents see standardized testing as a philosophical, political and ideological battlefield where the stakes include virtues such as freedom and equality, or the existential qualities of epistemology and ontology, or the social factors of race, poverty, cultural capital, and disparity, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Gumbo Ya-Ya or, What Pearson Can’t Hear: Opt-Out, Standardized Testing, and Student Surveillance

The High School Journal , Volume 98 (4) – Jun 19, 2015

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
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Abstract

From the Editorial Board Zan Crowder Stephanie Konle As end-of-course and end-of-grade testing season approaches in North Carolina, schools and school districts have been contacting members of the UNC School of Education with requests for aid in proctoring the upcoming tests. Mandates require that test administrators be accompanied by a proctor in order to protect the security of the testing environment. While this practice promotes suspicion about public school teachers who serve as test administrators, the mandate also presents the logistical problem of providing enough adults to serve as proctors for the hundreds of tests taken by students at the end of the school year. The proliferation of state-mandated tests, coupled with requirements for separate setting accommodations, creates a practical dilemma for schools. This ground-level tension between the mandates of standardized testing and the limited availability of resources necessary for compliance is an issue in the debate over opt-out policies that tends to be overlooked. While proponents and opponents see standardized testing as a philosophical, political and ideological battlefield where the stakes include virtues such as freedom and equality, or the existential qualities of epistemology and ontology, or the social factors of race, poverty, cultural capital, and disparity,

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 19, 2015

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