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Guest Editor's Introduction: The Future of Abolition Studies

Guest Editor's Introduction: The Future of Abolition Studies man isha si n ha, Guest Editor Guest Editor’s Introduction The Future of Abolition Studies When Judy Giesberg asked me to guest edit a special issue on abolition and solicit essays that would showcase new directions in abolition stud- ies, I welcomed the opportunity. For a field that has been ploughed thor - oughly—from global syntheses of the transition from slavery to freedom in the western world by some of the most eminent historians of slavery and abolition such as Robin Blackburn, Seymour Drescher, and David Brion Davis to numerous finely grained studies of African Americans, women, Garrisonian, political, and evangelical abolitionists in the last few decades—it might seem that we have nothing new left to say about aboli- tion. In fact, as the original essays in this issue illustrate, we have barely begun to uncover the long, diverse, and multifaceted history of the aboli- tion movement that goes well beyond old caricatures of irresponsible reli- gious fanatics on the one hand and the simple portrayal of heroic freedom fighters on the other. More importantly, individually and collectively, they challenge the oft repeated, virtually reflexive, received historical wisdom on abolition by both broadening our conception of what constitutes aboli- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Guest Editor's Introduction: The Future of Abolition Studies

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 8 (2) – May 25, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

man isha si n ha, Guest Editor Guest Editor’s Introduction The Future of Abolition Studies When Judy Giesberg asked me to guest edit a special issue on abolition and solicit essays that would showcase new directions in abolition stud- ies, I welcomed the opportunity. For a field that has been ploughed thor - oughly—from global syntheses of the transition from slavery to freedom in the western world by some of the most eminent historians of slavery and abolition such as Robin Blackburn, Seymour Drescher, and David Brion Davis to numerous finely grained studies of African Americans, women, Garrisonian, political, and evangelical abolitionists in the last few decades—it might seem that we have nothing new left to say about aboli- tion. In fact, as the original essays in this issue illustrate, we have barely begun to uncover the long, diverse, and multifaceted history of the aboli- tion movement that goes well beyond old caricatures of irresponsible reli- gious fanatics on the one hand and the simple portrayal of heroic freedom fighters on the other. More importantly, individually and collectively, they challenge the oft repeated, virtually reflexive, received historical wisdom on abolition by both broadening our conception of what constitutes aboli-

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 25, 2018

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