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Grounded Globalism: How the U.S. South Embraces the World (review)

Grounded Globalism: How the U.S. South Embraces the World (review) requires, Samuel Jones says, "In the summer, it's hotter than the vestibule of hell in here." Wilson's Ed Mitchell, a Fayetteville State University alumnus, Vietnam veteran, and former Ford Motor Company employee, echoes the theme: "This day and time, it's very difficult because people just are not programmed for manual labor." Among well-chosen anecdotes and the authors' considerable wit, examples like these infuse Holy Smoke with a sense of urgency and a feeling of impending loss. Lexington's Wayne Monk predicts that, in twenty years, true North Carolina barbecue will disappear. The authors report a 200 "best of " poll from Raleigh's Metro magazine that ranked a Memphis-style chain, a Texas-style chain, and an "Easternstyle" chain that cooks with electricity as readers' favorite barbecue places. "This story reveals epidemic ignorance among Triangle-area yuppies," declare the authors, who repeatedly deplore the adoption of gas and electricity by barbecue restaurants. If, in the face of chain restaurant takeover, there is any hope for real North Carolina barbecue, perhaps Holy Smoke itself will provide that promise. "Patronize places that take the trouble to do it right," the authors insist. This book may not cool the Eastern-Piedmont feuding. And maybe it shouldn't, for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Grounded Globalism: How the U.S. South Embraces the World (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 15 (1) – Feb 21, 2009

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Center for the Study of the American South
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

requires, Samuel Jones says, "In the summer, it's hotter than the vestibule of hell in here." Wilson's Ed Mitchell, a Fayetteville State University alumnus, Vietnam veteran, and former Ford Motor Company employee, echoes the theme: "This day and time, it's very difficult because people just are not programmed for manual labor." Among well-chosen anecdotes and the authors' considerable wit, examples like these infuse Holy Smoke with a sense of urgency and a feeling of impending loss. Lexington's Wayne Monk predicts that, in twenty years, true North Carolina barbecue will disappear. The authors report a 200 "best of " poll from Raleigh's Metro magazine that ranked a Memphis-style chain, a Texas-style chain, and an "Easternstyle" chain that cooks with electricity as readers' favorite barbecue places. "This story reveals epidemic ignorance among Triangle-area yuppies," declare the authors, who repeatedly deplore the adoption of gas and electricity by barbecue restaurants. If, in the face of chain restaurant takeover, there is any hope for real North Carolina barbecue, perhaps Holy Smoke itself will provide that promise. "Patronize places that take the trouble to do it right," the authors insist. This book may not cool the Eastern-Piedmont feuding. And maybe it shouldn't, for

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 21, 2009

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