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Goodbye Crude World: The Aesthetics of Environmental Catastrophe in Michel Faber's The Book of Strange New Things and Edward Burtynsky's Oil Photographs

Goodbye Crude World: The Aesthetics of Environmental Catastrophe in Michel Faber's The Book of... Sofia Ahlberg The Aesthetics of Environmental Catastrophe in Michel Faber’s The Book of Strange New Things and Edward Burtynsky’s Oil Photographs For Halloween in 2015, The Guardian published a piece on the fears of a range of authors including novelist Michel Faber. Faber recalled the sense of alarm he felt as a child while viewing a Christian inspirational film. It was set in a circus in which a Jesus-­ike clown takes on another’s suffering as a magician saws his female assisl tant in half. Faber was frightened, he says, because as a nine-­year old he was unable to read the film allegorically as a parable of Christ’s passion redeeming humanity. He saw only the violence done to the woman fully felt by Christ-­ s-­ lown, whose a c face contorted with agonising pain during the performance. To those familiar with Faber’s work, and perhaps especially his recent, and by his own account final, novel The Book of Strange New Things (2014), fear and apprehension are to be expected. Indeed, a sense of impending doom pervades this most recent novel until it becomes the terrifying actuality of complete global breakdown. As we shall see, in the novel the plight http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Goodbye Crude World: The Aesthetics of Environmental Catastrophe in Michel Faber's The Book of Strange New Things and Edward Burtynsky's Oil Photographs

The Comparatist , Volume 41 – Nov 1, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
Publisher site
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Abstract

Sofia Ahlberg The Aesthetics of Environmental Catastrophe in Michel Faber’s The Book of Strange New Things and Edward Burtynsky’s Oil Photographs For Halloween in 2015, The Guardian published a piece on the fears of a range of authors including novelist Michel Faber. Faber recalled the sense of alarm he felt as a child while viewing a Christian inspirational film. It was set in a circus in which a Jesus-­ike clown takes on another’s suffering as a magician saws his female assisl tant in half. Faber was frightened, he says, because as a nine-­year old he was unable to read the film allegorically as a parable of Christ’s passion redeeming humanity. He saw only the violence done to the woman fully felt by Christ-­ s-­ lown, whose a c face contorted with agonising pain during the performance. To those familiar with Faber’s work, and perhaps especially his recent, and by his own account final, novel The Book of Strange New Things (2014), fear and apprehension are to be expected. Indeed, a sense of impending doom pervades this most recent novel until it becomes the terrifying actuality of complete global breakdown. As we shall see, in the novel the plight

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 1, 2017

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