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Goldgyfan or Goldwlance: A Christian Apology for Beowulf and Treasure

Goldgyfan or Goldwlance: A Christian Apology for Beowulf and Treasure STUDIES  IN  PH ILOLOGy Volume  10 7  Winter   2010  Number   1 Goldgyfan or Goldwlance:   A  Christian Apology for   Beowulf and Treasure by Joseph E. Marshall he  debate  as  to  what  extent  Beowulf  is  a  Christianp   oem  often  centers on  the  poet’s  struggle  to  understand  and  reconcileits     T obvious  pagan  elements  with  its  religious  values.  One  such  area of  concernis     the  hoard  of  referencesto     treasure.While     commen- tatorsha   ve  recognized the  importantpresence     of  gift-exchangein     Beo- wulf,  they  invariablydisa   gree  about  what  treasurerepresen   tsand     how  it  functions  within  the  poem,  especially  in  the  final  one  third  of  the  poem  (lines 2200  to  3182)  where  Beowulf  eagerlyexchan   ges  his  life  for  the  dragon’s buried  treasure.A     host  of  critics,includin   gK   emp  Malone,  E.  G.  Stanley, MargaretGol   dsmith,  Eugene  j .  Crook,  and  Alan  Bliss,  question  Beowulf’s  motives  for  seeking  the  gold  and  concludetha   th   e  is  guilty of  avarice.Oth   ercrit   ics,such     as  Willem Helder,P   atricia Silb   er,  Robert  Creed,  Henry  Woolf,  and  Wade  Tarzia, grapple  with  the  dubi- ous  nature  of  the  dragon’s  hoard  and  offer  a  variety  of  explanations  for  its  curse,  plundering, and  reburial.This http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in Philology University of North Carolina Press

Goldgyfan or Goldwlance: A Christian Apology for Beowulf and Treasure

Studies in Philology , Volume 107 (1) – Jan 13, 2010

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1543-0383

Abstract

STUDIES  IN  PH ILOLOGy Volume  10 7  Winter   2010  Number   1 Goldgyfan or Goldwlance:   A  Christian Apology for   Beowulf and Treasure by Joseph E. Marshall he  debate  as  to  what  extent  Beowulf  is  a  Christianp   oem  often  centers on  the  poet’s  struggle  to  understand  and  reconcileits     T obvious  pagan  elements  with  its  religious  values.  One  such  area of  concernis     the  hoard  of  referencesto     treasure.While     commen- tatorsha   ve  recognized the  importantpresence     of  gift-exchangein     Beo- wulf,  they  invariablydisa   gree  about  what  treasurerepresen   tsand     how  it  functions  within  the  poem,  especially  in  the  final  one  third  of  the  poem  (lines 2200  to  3182)  where  Beowulf  eagerlyexchan   ges  his  life  for  the  dragon’s buried  treasure.A     host  of  critics,includin   gK   emp  Malone,  E.  G.  Stanley, MargaretGol   dsmith,  Eugene  j .  Crook,  and  Alan  Bliss,  question  Beowulf’s  motives  for  seeking  the  gold  and  concludetha   th   e  is  guilty of  avarice.Oth   ercrit   ics,such     as  Willem Helder,P   atricia Silb   er,  Robert  Creed,  Henry  Woolf,  and  Wade  Tarzia, grapple  with  the  dubi- ous  nature  of  the  dragon’s  hoard  and  offer  a  variety  of  explanations  for  its  curse,  plundering, and  reburial.This

Journal

Studies in PhilologyUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 13, 2010

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